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==Other versions of the legendarium==
 
==Other versions of the legendarium==
  
Eriol has been a background figure in Tolkien's legendarium, being a [[Wikipedia:frame story|frame character]] to whom many texts are fictionally attributed. Ælfwine is a later version of a figure Tolkien first named as [[Ottor Wǽfre]] in ''[[The Book of Lost Tales]]''. Ælfwine/Eriol acquired lore from the Elves of Eressea, or translated existing Elvish works into [[Old English]] (a minor discrepancy is that whereas Ælfwine is described as hailing from the north-west of England, his texts are in the Mercian dialect, which was Tolkien's favourite).  
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Eriol has been a background figure in Tolkien's legendarium, being a [[Wikipedia:frame story|frame character]] to whom many texts are fictionally attributed. Ælfwine is a later version of a figure Tolkien first named as [[Ottor Wǽfre]] in ''[[The Book of Lost Tales]]''. Ælfwine/Eriol wrote down lore acquired by the Elves of Eressea, or translated existing Elvish works into [[Old English]].  
  
As a literary device, Ælfwine/Eriol actually serves an in-universe explanation about the origin of the [[legendarium]]. On the other hand, ''[[The Lord of the Rings]]'' suggests that [[Bilbo Baggins]] is the originator of the narratives, through his [[Red Book]] and his [[Translations from the Elvish]] which he compiled in [[Rivendell]] (which supposedly included Elvish lore including the ''Ainulindale'' and the ''Quenta Silmarillion'').  
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A minor discrepancy is that whereas Ælfwine is described as hailing from the north-west of England, his texts are in the Mercian dialect, which was Tolkien's favourite. As a literary device, Ælfwine/Eriol actually serves an in-universe explanation about the origin of the [[legendarium]].  
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On the other hand, ''[[The Lord of the Rings]]'' suggests that [[Bilbo Baggins]] is the originator of the narratives, through his [[Red Book]] and his [[Translations from the Elvish]] which he compiled in [[Rivendell]] (which supposedly included Elvish lore including the ''Ainulindale'' and the ''Quenta Silmarillion'').  
  
 
Still, in some of the later writings of Tolkien written after ''The Lord of the Rings'', Ælfwine is still referred and it is hinted that he didn't fully abandon the idea of Ælfwine's translations, since the two frameworks (Red Book and Ælfwine) are not mutually exclusive.
 
Still, in some of the later writings of Tolkien written after ''The Lord of the Rings'', Ælfwine is still referred and it is hinted that he didn't fully abandon the idea of Ælfwine's translations, since the two frameworks (Red Book and Ælfwine) are not mutually exclusive.

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