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AYA

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'''AYA''' is a [[Primitive Quendian]] [[Sundocarme|root]] signifying reverence and holiness. AYA-N is given the meaning "treat with awe/reverence", AYA- is given the meaning "revere", and AYA/AYA- is given the meaning "blessed".<ref name=Eldarin>{{PE|Eldarin}}, p. 149 (roots appearing as "√AYA-N", "√AYA-" and "√AYA; AYA-")</ref>
 
'''AYA''' is a [[Primitive Quendian]] [[Sundocarme|root]] signifying reverence and holiness. AYA-N is given the meaning "treat with awe/reverence", AYA- is given the meaning "revere", and AYA/AYA- is given the meaning "blessed".<ref name=Eldarin>{{PE|Eldarin}}, p. 149 (roots appearing as "√AYA-N", "√AYA-" and "√AYA; AYA-")</ref>
  
Roots of opposite meaning are [[SKŪ|SKŪ, KHŪ]] ("curse") and [[UK|UK, UKLA]].<ref name=Eldarin/>
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Roots of opposite meaning are [[SKŪ|SKŪ, KHŪ]] ("curse"), [[OKO]] ("wicked, evil"), and [[UK|UK, UKLA]].<ref name=Eldarin/>
  
 
==Derivatives==
 
==Derivatives==

Revision as of 23:02, 4 February 2011

AYA is a Primitive Quendian root signifying reverence and holiness. AYA-N is given the meaning "treat with awe/reverence", AYA- is given the meaning "revere", and AYA/AYA- is given the meaning "blessed".[1]

Roots of opposite meaning are SKŪ, KHŪ ("curse"), OKO ("wicked, evil"), and UK, UKLA.[1]

Derivatives

Other versions of the Legendarium

In the Quenya Lexicon appears the root AYA, signifying "honour, revere".[2] In the Etymologies appears the roots AYAN- (yielding Common Eldarin ayan-, "holy") and YAN- (yielding Quenya yána, Noldorin iaun, "holy place, fane, sanctuary").[3]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 J.R.R. Tolkien, "Words, Phrases and Passages in Various Tongues in The Lord of the Rings: Eldarin Roots and Stems", in Parma Eldalamberon XVII (edited by Christopher Gilson), p. 149 (roots appearing as "√AYA-N", "√AYA-" and "√AYA; AYA-")
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Qenyaqetsa: The Qenya Phonology and Lexicon", in Parma Eldalamberon XII (edited by Carl F. Hostetter, Christopher Gilson, Arden R. Smith, and Patrick H. Wynne) (root appearing with an inverted breve below on the "Y")
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Lost Road and Other Writings, "Part Three: The Etymologies", pp. 350, 400