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A Rhyme of Lore

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'''Rhymes of Lore''' are small poems that refer to ancient events of history. Rhymes of Lore seem to originate from the [[Dúnedain]] of [[Arnor]], some were known to the [[Hobbits]] who also had some Rhymes of their own.<ref>{{TT|Palantir}}</ref> The [[Long List of the Ents]] may also be an example of Rhymes of Lore.<ref name=guide>{{HM|Guide}} p. 329</ref>
 
'''Rhymes of Lore''' are small poems that refer to ancient events of history. Rhymes of Lore seem to originate from the [[Dúnedain]] of [[Arnor]], some were known to the [[Hobbits]] who also had some Rhymes of their own.<ref>{{TT|Palantir}}</ref> The [[Long List of the Ents]] may also be an example of Rhymes of Lore.<ref name=guide>{{HM|Guide}} p. 329</ref>
  
On his way to [[Minas Tirith]] [[Gandalf]] mumbled to himself a Rhyme about the [[Downfall of Númenor]], making [[Pippin]] to inquire about it.
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On his way to [[Minas Tirith]] [[Gandalf]] mumbled to himself a Rhyme about the [[Downfall of Númenor]], causing [[Pippin]] to inquire about it.
 
:''Tall ships and [[High Men|tall kings]]<br>Three times three,<br>What brought they from the [[Númenor|foundered land]] <br>Over the [[Belegaer|flowing sea]]? <br>Seven stars and [[palantíri|seven stones]] <br>And one [[White Tree|white tree]].''<ref group=note>The rhyme is titled "A Rhyme of Lore"</ref>
 
:''Tall ships and [[High Men|tall kings]]<br>Three times three,<br>What brought they from the [[Númenor|foundered land]] <br>Over the [[Belegaer|flowing sea]]? <br>Seven stars and [[palantíri|seven stones]] <br>And one [[White Tree|white tree]].''<ref group=note>The rhyme is titled "A Rhyme of Lore"</ref>
  
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[[Robert Foster]] describes the Rhymes of Lore as a medium that aids the retention of ancient facts.<ref name=guide/> They are comparable to [[Wikipedia:Gnomic poetry#Medieval_and_early_modern_gnomic_literature|Gnomic Verses]] that preserve important ideas of the Anglo-Saxon society. Their rhyme make them easy to remember.<ref>{{webcite|articleurl=http://www.tolkiensociety.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Anglo-Saxon-Part-1.pdf|articlename=Tolkien Society Anglo-Saxon Study Pack 1|dated=2014|website=[http://www.tolkiensociety.org The Tolkien Society]}}</ref>
 
[[Robert Foster]] describes the Rhymes of Lore as a medium that aids the retention of ancient facts.<ref name=guide/> They are comparable to [[Wikipedia:Gnomic poetry#Medieval_and_early_modern_gnomic_literature|Gnomic Verses]] that preserve important ideas of the Anglo-Saxon society. Their rhyme make them easy to remember.<ref>{{webcite|articleurl=http://www.tolkiensociety.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Anglo-Saxon-Part-1.pdf|articlename=Tolkien Society Anglo-Saxon Study Pack 1|dated=2014|website=[http://www.tolkiensociety.org The Tolkien Society]}}</ref>
 
==Adaptations==
 
==Adaptations==
A musical version of this poem was recorded by the [[Tolkien Ensemble]] on their album ''A Night in Rivendell''.
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A musical version of this poem was recorded by the [[Tolkien Ensemble]] on their album ''[[A Night in Rivendell]]''.
 
{{references|notes}}
 
{{references|notes}}
 
[[Category:Poems by J.R.R. Tolkien]]
 
[[Category:Poems by J.R.R. Tolkien]]

Latest revision as of 17:04, 30 July 2019

Rhymes of Lore are small poems that refer to ancient events of history. Rhymes of Lore seem to originate from the Dúnedain of Arnor, some were known to the Hobbits who also had some Rhymes of their own.[1] The Long List of the Ents may also be an example of Rhymes of Lore.[2]

On his way to Minas Tirith Gandalf mumbled to himself a Rhyme about the Downfall of Númenor, causing Pippin to inquire about it.

Tall ships and tall kings
Three times three,
What brought they from the foundered land
Over the flowing sea?
Seven stars and seven stones
And one white tree.
[note 1]

Contents

[edit] Inspiration

Robert Foster describes the Rhymes of Lore as a medium that aids the retention of ancient facts.[2] They are comparable to Gnomic Verses that preserve important ideas of the Anglo-Saxon society. Their rhyme make them easy to remember.[3]

[edit] Adaptations

A musical version of this poem was recorded by the Tolkien Ensemble on their album A Night in Rivendell.

Notes

  1. The rhyme is titled "A Rhyme of Lore"

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Two Towers, "The Palantír"
  2. 2.0 2.1 Robert Foster, The Complete Guide to Middle-earth p. 329
  3. "Tolkien Society Anglo-Saxon Study Pack 1" dated 24 February 2014, The Tolkien Society (accessed 24 February 2020)