Tolkien Gateway

A Tolkien Compass

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* [[Walter Scheps]]: "The Fairy-tale Morality of ''The Lord of the Rings''"
 
* [[Walter Scheps]]: "The Fairy-tale Morality of ''The Lord of the Rings''"
 
* [[Agnes Perkins]] and [[Helen Hill]]: "The Corruption of Power"
 
* [[Agnes Perkins]] and [[Helen Hill]]: "The Corruption of Power"
* [[Deborah C. Rogers]]: "Everyclod and Everyhero: The Image of Man in Tolkien"
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* [[Deborah Rogers|Deborah C. Rogers]]: "Everyclod and Everyhero: The Image of Man in Tolkien"
 
* [[Richard C. West]]: "The Interlace Structure of ''The Lord of the Rings''"
 
* [[Richard C. West]]: "The Interlace Structure of ''The Lord of the Rings''"
 
* [[David M. Miller]]: "Narrative Pattern in ''The Fellowship of the Ring''"
 
* [[David M. Miller]]: "Narrative Pattern in ''The Fellowship of the Ring''"
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* [[Walter Scheps]]: "The Fairy-tale Morality of ''The Lord of the Rings''"
 
* [[Walter Scheps]]: "The Fairy-tale Morality of ''The Lord of the Rings''"
 
* [[Agnes Perkins]] and [[Helen Hill]]: "The Corruption of Power"
 
* [[Agnes Perkins]] and [[Helen Hill]]: "The Corruption of Power"
* [[Deborah C. Rogers]]: "Everyclod and Everyhero: The Image of Man in Tolkien"
+
* [[Deborah Rogers|Deborah C. Rogers]]: "Everyclod and Everyhero: The Image of Man in Tolkien"
 
* [[Richard C. West]]: "The Interlace Structure of ''The Lord of the Rings''"
 
* [[Richard C. West]]: "The Interlace Structure of ''The Lord of the Rings''"
 
* [[David M. Miller]]: "Narrative Pattern in ''The Fellowship of the Ring''"
 
* [[David M. Miller]]: "Narrative Pattern in ''The Fellowship of the Ring''"
Line 60: Line 60:
 
* [[Walter Scheps]]: "The Fairy-tale Morality of ''The Lord of the Rings''"
 
* [[Walter Scheps]]: "The Fairy-tale Morality of ''The Lord of the Rings''"
 
* [[Agnes Perkins]] and [[Helen Hill]]: "The Corruption of Power"
 
* [[Agnes Perkins]] and [[Helen Hill]]: "The Corruption of Power"
* [[Deborah C. Rogers]]: "Everyclod and Everyhero: The Image of Man in Tolkien"
+
* [[Deborah Rogers|Deborah C. Rogers]]: "Everyclod and Everyhero: The Image of Man in Tolkien"
 
* [[Richard C. West]]: "The Interlace Structure of ''The Lord of the Rings''"
 
* [[Richard C. West]]: "The Interlace Structure of ''The Lord of the Rings''"
 
* [[David M. Miller]]: "Narrative Pattern in ''The Fellowship of the Ring''"
 
* [[David M. Miller]]: "Narrative Pattern in ''The Fellowship of the Ring''"

Revision as of 18:41, 5 April 2012

A Tolkien Compass
ATolkienCompass.png
EditorJared Lobdell
PublisherDel Rey, Open Court
Released1975
FormatPaperback
Pages216 (1st ed), 208 (3rd ed)
ISBN0875483038

A Tolkien Compass: Fascinating Studies and Interpretations of J.R.R. Tolkien's Most Popular Epic Fantasies is a collection of essays on J.R.R. Tolkien's writings, edited by Jared Lobdell. Most contributors were, like Lobdell, part of the University of Wisconsin Tolkien Society.[1]

The first edition was published in 1975, and a second and third edition followed in 1980 and 2002. The first edition also contained Tolkien's Guide to the Names in The Lord of the Rings (pp. 153-201), but this has been omitted from later editions due to complaints from the Tolkien Estate, who are the legal owners of the text.

Contents

First Edition (1975)

From the Publisher

"For those who have dismissed Tolkien's writings as simply escapist literature, the sophisticated tome and perceptive, probing insights of most of the collected articles may be an awakening to a deeper appreciation of these complex classics"
― The A.R.E. Journal

The intricacies of Tolkien's puns, the moral geography of Middle-earth, the true character of the Fellowship of the Ring and the hobbits' friends and foes, the sheer musical beauty of the names Tolkien invents - all are given careful attention. Tolkien's consuming involvement in his books merits this loving exactness.

W.H. Auden wrote that he was especially astounded by Tolkien's gift for inventing proper names. Auden would have avidly studied the final offering of this book. For here is a true polestar for all wondering Tolkien fans: Tolkien's own unpublished "Guide to the Names in The Lord of the Rings." Originally, Tolkien prepared this guide for translators of his work. Here, he shares his dragon-hoard of etymological treasures. His asides to the reader on how he came to choose some of the names bring us into Tolkien's own studyroom.[2]

Contents

Second Edition (1980)

Contents

Third Edition (2003)

From the Publisher

A Tolkien Compass offers surprising insights into the mind of the creator of Lord of the Rings. Tolkien's political, religious, cosmological, and psychological principles are explored by ten writers with different backgrounds and divergent approaches. As leading authority Tom Shippey observes in his foreword, A Tolkien Compass lives up to its name by providing vital guidance to both new and seasoned travelers in Middle-earth.

Contents

References

  1. Jared Lobdell, A Tolkien Compass, "Introduction"
  2. Jared Lobdell, A Tolkien Compass, Front endpaper