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Alcarinquë

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'''Alcarinquë''' ([[Quenya|Q]]: ''The Glorious''); In the distant past, at the time of the awakening of the [[Elves]], [[Varda]] added many brilliant stars to to the heavens using the shimmering dews of [[Telperion]] the Silver Tree. Among these were the familiar star-patterns we still know today, and other lights that were not truly stars. Among these was Alcarinquë - the planet we know as Jupiter. Its [[Elvish]] name translates as 'The Glorious', because it would have been the brightest object in the skies at that time (the Sun, the Moon, and Venus - the [[Silmarils|Silmaril]] of [[Eärendil]] - were all far in the future at this ancient time).
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'''Alcarinquë''' was a name of one of the [[stars]] in [[Arda]].<ref name=SI>{{S|Index}}</ref>
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==History==
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In the distant past, at the time of the awakening of the [[Elves]], [[Varda]] added many brilliant stars to to the heavens using the shimmering dews of [[Telperion]] the Silver Tree. Among these were the familiar star-patterns we still know today, and other lights that were not truly stars. Among these was ''Alcarinquë'' - the planet we know as [[Wikipedia:Jupiter|Jupiter]].<ref>{{S|3}}</ref><ref name=MRS/>
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''Alcarinquë'' would likely have been the brightest object in the skies at that time (the Sun, the Moon, and Venus - the [[Silmarils|Silmaril]] of [[Eärendil]] - were all far in the future at this ancient time).{{or}}
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==Etymology==
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''Alcarinquë'' (or ''Alkarinque'') is a [[Quenya]] name meaning "The Glorious",<ref name=SI/><ref name=MRS>{{MR|Star}}, p. 435</ref> likely derived from the Quenya adjective ''[[alcarinqua]]'' ("glorious").<ref>{{WJ|Author}}, p. 412 (note 21)</ref><ref>{{PE|17}}, p. 24</ref><ref>{{LR|Etymologies}}, p. 348</ref>
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{{cosmology}}
 
{{cosmology}}
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{{references}}
 
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[[Category:Stars]]
 
[[Category:Stars]]

Revision as of 15:41, 10 July 2011

Alcarinquë was a name of one of the stars in Arda.[1]

History

In the distant past, at the time of the awakening of the Elves, Varda added many brilliant stars to to the heavens using the shimmering dews of Telperion the Silver Tree. Among these were the familiar star-patterns we still know today, and other lights that were not truly stars. Among these was Alcarinquë - the planet we know as Jupiter.[2][3]

Alcarinquë would likely have been the brightest object in the skies at that time (the Sun, the Moon, and Venus - the Silmaril of Eärendil - were all far in the future at this ancient time).Template:Or

Etymology

Alcarinquë (or Alkarinque) is a Quenya name meaning "The Glorious",[1][3] likely derived from the Quenya adjective alcarinqua ("glorious").[4][5][6]

Middle-earth Cosmology
 Constellations  Anarríma · Durin's Crown · Menelmacar · Remmirath · Soronúmë · Telumendil · Valacirca · Wilwarin
Stars  Alcarinquë · Borgil · Carnil · Elemmírë · Helluin · Luinil · Lumbar · Morwinyon · Nénar · Star of Eärendil · Til 
The Airs  Aiwenórë · Fanyamar · Ilmen · Menel · Vaiya · Veil of Arda · Vista
Narsilion  Arien · Moon (Isil, Ithil, Rána) · Sun (Anar, Anor, Vása) · Tilion
See Also  Abyss · Arda · Circles of the World · · Timeless Halls · Two Lamps · Two Trees · Void

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Index of Names"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Coming of the Elves and the Captivity of Melkor"
  3. 3.0 3.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Morgoth's Ring, "Index: Star-names", p. 435
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "Part Four. Quendi and Eldar: Author's Notes to Quendi and Eldar", p. 412 (note 21)
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Words, Phrases and Passages in Various Tongues in The Lord of the Rings", in Parma Eldalamberon XVII (edited by Christopher Gilson), p. 24
  6. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Lost Road and Other Writings, "Part Three: The Etymologies", p. 348