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Anach

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'''Anach''' (from ''[[an]]'' = "long") was a long, narrow defile that ran down out of the highlands of [[Dorthonion]], cutting southwest between the near-impassable mountains of the [[Crissaegrim]] and [[Ered Gorgoroth]]. Towards its southern end, where it opened into the land of [[Dimbar]], were the springs of the River [[Mindeb]].<ref>{{S|Map}}</ref>
 
'''Anach''' (from ''[[an]]'' = "long") was a long, narrow defile that ran down out of the highlands of [[Dorthonion]], cutting southwest between the near-impassable mountains of the [[Crissaegrim]] and [[Ered Gorgoroth]]. Towards its southern end, where it opened into the land of [[Dimbar]], were the springs of the River [[Mindeb]].<ref>{{S|Map}}</ref>
  

Latest revision as of 08:41, 22 June 2012

Anach
Physical Description
TypeDefile
LocationSplitting between Ered Gorgoroth and the Crissaegrim
InhabitantsOrcs of Morgoth, foul unknown beasts
DescriptionLong and narrow
General Information
EtymologyS. an "long"

Anach (from an = "long") was a long, narrow defile that ran down out of the highlands of Dorthonion, cutting southwest between the near-impassable mountains of the Crissaegrim and Ered Gorgoroth. Towards its southern end, where it opened into the land of Dimbar, were the springs of the River Mindeb.[1]

In the later years of the First Age, Dorthonion fell under Morgoth's control, and with it the Pass of Anach. His Orcs began to use it as a way down from the highlands, building a road through the valley to reach and harass the lands beyond.[2] Ultimately they succeeded in conquering not only Dimbar, but also the regions to the east that ran along the borders of Doriath.

[edit] References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Map of Beleriand and the Lands to the North"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of Túrin Turambar"