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Asfaloth

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"Noro lim, noro lim, Asfaloth!"
Glorfindel[1]

Asfaloth was the white horse of Glorfindel.

Contents

History

Asfaloth was ridden by Glorfindel during the search for Aragorn and the Hobbits on their way to Rivendell. After he found them and the Black Riders attacked, Glorfindel dismounted and placed Frodo Baggins (the Ringbearer) on its back, then ordered it forward to safety at the Ford of Bruinen. Asfaloth was a remarkably fast horse, outpacing the black steeds of the Black Riders, even so that it reached the Fords first.[1]

Etymology

The name Asfaloth means "Sunlit Foam" in Sindarin, from as and faloth.[2]

Other Versions of the Legendarium

In answer to a question from Rhona Beare in 1958, Tolkien admitted that Glorfindel would not have used a bridal and bit when riding Asfaloth; instead he would only have used an ornamental headstall with a plume, jewels, and small bells. He assured her that he would change bridle and bit to headstall in future editions, a change that was made.[3]

Portrayal in adaptations

1981: The Lord of the Rings (1981 radio series):

Asfaloth carries Frodo to Rivendell.[4]

2001: The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring:

Asfaloth is the horse of Arwen, having taken over Glorfindel's role. Three white Andalusians were used: Florian, the hero horse; Hero, used for high speed chases; and Odie, which was used for scenes in which Arwen was unhorsed.[5] Jane Abbott[6] and Sonia Duncan[7] were Liv Tyler's riding doubles.

2002: The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (video game):

Asfaloth is the horse of Glorfindel. He sends it to carry Frodo to Rivendell.

2006: The Lord of the Rings: The Battle for Middle-earth II:

With Glorfindel added, Asfaloth is now Glorfindel's horse when mounted. Arwen's horse, also white, is not named.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring, "Flight to the Ford"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Words, Phrases and Passages in Various Tongues in The Lord of the Rings", in Parma Eldalamberon XVII (edited by Christopher Gilson)
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien; Humphrey Carpenter, Christopher Tolkien (eds.), The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien, Letter 211, (dated 14 October 1958)
  4. The Lord of the Rings (1981 radio series), "The Knife In The Dark (1981 episode)"
  5. The Fellowship of the Ring at AHA
  6. Home of the Horselords
  7. Trickrider.co.nz