Tolkien Gateway

Atani

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{{Pronounce|Atani.mp3|Ardamir}}
 
{{Pronounce|Atani.mp3|Ardamir}}
'''Atani''' was a [[Quenya]] name for [[Men]],<ref>{{S|Men}}</ref> and especially the [[Men]] of the [[Edain#The Three Houses|Three Houses]] of the [[Edain]]. The singular of Atani is Atan.  These are the equivalents of [[Sindarin]] ''Edain'' and ''[[Adan]]'', respectively.
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'''Atani''' was a [[Quenya]] name for [[Men]],<ref>{{S|Men}}</ref> and especially the [[Men]] of the [[Edain#The Three Houses|Three Houses]] of the [[Edain]]. However it was seldomly applied to the Men east of the [[Blue Mountains]].<ref>{{S|Index}}</ref>
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==Etymology==
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''Atan'' pl. ''Atani'' is glossed as "Second People" in the Silmarillion Index. (cf: ''[[atta]]'' "two").
  
==External links==
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The equivalents of [[Sindarin]] are ''[[Adan]]'' pl. ''Edain''.
*[http://www.taibu.net/familytree Family-Tree of the Eldar and Atani]
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The word appears in names such as [[Núnatani], [[Hróatani]], [[Atanalcar]], [[Atanamir]], [[Atanatar]] and [[Atanatari]].
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==Other versions of the Legendarium==
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In a draft to the text ''[[Of Dwarves and Men]]'', [[Tolkien]] considered that the word is derived from the [[Taliska|language]] of the [[Folk of Beor]], but as [[Christopher Tolkien]] noted, it contradicted the final version of ''[[The Silmarillion]]''.<ref>{{PM|Dwarves}}</ref>
  
 
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Revision as of 17:10, 6 May 2016

Atani was a Quenya name for Men,[1] and especially the Men of the Three Houses of the Edain. However it was seldomly applied to the Men east of the Blue Mountains.[2]

Etymology

Atan pl. Atani is glossed as "Second People" in the Silmarillion Index. (cf: atta "two").

The equivalents of Sindarin are Adan pl. Edain.

The word appears in names such as [[Núnatani], Hróatani, Atanalcar, Atanamir, Atanatar and Atanatari.

Other versions of the Legendarium

In a draft to the text Of Dwarves and Men, Tolkien considered that the word is derived from the language of the Folk of Beor, but as Christopher Tolkien noted, it contradicted the final version of The Silmarillion.[3]

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of Men"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Index of Names"
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "Of Dwarves and Men"