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Azanulbizar

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It is called [[Nanduhirion]] by the [[Elves]].
 
It is called [[Nanduhirion]] by the [[Elves]].
 
==Etymology==
 
==Etymology==
The etymology of the word has two alternative interpretations: it is either [[Azanul]]+[[bizar]] or [[Uzn|Azan]]+[[ûl]]+[[bizar]].
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The etymology of the word has two alternative interpretations: it is either ''[[Azanul]]+[[bizar]]'' or ''[[Uzn|Azan]]+[[ûl]]+[[bizar]]''.
  
 
[[Tolkien]] stated that "the Common Speech form is an accurate translation: the valley of the dim (overshadowed) rills that ran down the mountainside"<ref>[[A Tolkien Compass]] p. 182</ref>. In another point it is given as "Vale of Dim Streams" with three elements<ref>{{HM|RS}} p. 466</ref>. Tolkien experimented with various interpretations of the different elements, though the whole was to somehow express "Dimrill Dale".  
 
[[Tolkien]] stated that "the Common Speech form is an accurate translation: the valley of the dim (overshadowed) rills that ran down the mountainside"<ref>[[A Tolkien Compass]] p. 182</ref>. In another point it is given as "Vale of Dim Streams" with three elements<ref>{{HM|RS}} p. 466</ref>. Tolkien experimented with various interpretations of the different elements, though the whole was to somehow express "Dimrill Dale".  
 
{{references}}
 
{{references}}
 
[[Category:Khuzdul words]]
 
[[Category:Khuzdul words]]
[[de:Schattenbachtal]]
 
 
[[fi:Azanulbizar]]
 
[[fi:Azanulbizar]]

Revision as of 13:37, 9 April 2009

Azanulbizar is a Khuzdul name for the valley between two arms of the Misty Mountains, and means "Dimrill Dale".

It is called Nanduhirion by the Elves.

Etymology

The etymology of the word has two alternative interpretations: it is either Azanul+bizar or Azan+ûl+bizar.

Tolkien stated that "the Common Speech form is an accurate translation: the valley of the dim (overshadowed) rills that ran down the mountainside"[1]. In another point it is given as "Vale of Dim Streams" with three elements[2]. Tolkien experimented with various interpretations of the different elements, though the whole was to somehow express "Dimrill Dale".

References

  1. A Tolkien Compass p. 182
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Return of the Shadow p. 466