Tolkien Gateway

Badgers

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[[Image:Badgers.jpg|thumb|Badgers in ''[[The Lord of the Rings Roleplaying Game|LOTRRPG]]'']]  
 
[[Image:Badgers.jpg|thumb|Badgers in ''[[The Lord of the Rings Roleplaying Game|LOTRRPG]]'']]  
  
<small>"''There must have been a mighty crowd of dwarves here at one time and every one of them busier than badgers for five hundred years to make all this, and most in hard rock too!''" ([[Sam Gamgee]])<ref name=FRII4/></small>
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<small>"''There must have been a mighty crowd of dwarves here at one time and every one of them busier than badgers for five hundred years to make all this, and most in hard rock too!''" ([[Samwise Gamgee|Sam Gamgee]])<ref name=FRII4/></small>
  
 
'''Badgers''' were known in Northwestern [[Middle-earth]] for being excellent hole-diggers.<ref name=FRII4>{{FR|II4}}</ref> [[Men]] used traps to catch these animals.<ref>{{TT|III7}}</ref>  
 
'''Badgers''' were known in Northwestern [[Middle-earth]] for being excellent hole-diggers.<ref name=FRII4>{{FR|II4}}</ref> [[Men]] used traps to catch these animals.<ref>{{TT|III7}}</ref>  

Revision as of 18:46, 10 January 2011

"There must have been a mighty crowd of dwarves here at one time and every one of them busier than badgers for five hundred years to make all this, and most in hard rock too!" (Sam Gamgee)[1]

Badgers were known in Northwestern Middle-earth for being excellent hole-diggers.[1] Men used traps to catch these animals.[2]

A mysterious kind of apparently sentient badgers, only told of in legends, were called the Badger-folk.

Portrayal in adaptations

1982-97: Middle-earth Role Playing:

Badgers (which are given game statistics) are carnivorous animals of the fauna of Rhovanion. They are timid but can be dangerous if cornered.[3]

2002-5: The Lord of the Rings Roleplaying Game:

Badgers (which are given game statistics) can be find in the Shire and throughout Eriador.[4]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring, "A Journey in the Dark"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Two Towers, "Helm's Deep"
  3. Zachariah Woolf (1995), Lake-town (#2016), p. 149
  4. Scott Bennie, Mike Mearls, Steve Miller, Aaron Rosenberg, Chris Seeman, Owen Seyler, and George Strayton (2003), Fell Beasts and Wondrous Magic, p. 56