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Bay of Belfalas

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The Bay of Belfalas, also called the windy Bay of Bel,[1][2] was a great gulf of the Great Sea lying to the south of Gondor, within whose waters stood the island of Tolfalas; the River Anduin flowed into the Bay. Directly north of the Bay was the Gondorian region of Belfalas.[3]

The shores around the Bay were mostly desolate in the Second Age, except from a First Age settlement of Sindar which became the haven Edhellond.[4][5]

During the Drowning of Númenor, the Bay of Belfalas was much filled at the east and south, and land upheaved around it. Anduin carved a new path by many mouths to the Bay.[6] Tolfalas was almost destroyed, and was left at last like a barren and lonely mountain in the water not far from the issue of the River.

The coasts of Gondor were assaulted by the Corsairs of Umbar. In T.A. 2758 three fleets from Umbar attacked and waged war on all the Gondorian coasts until Beregond overcame the invaders.[7]

[edit] Other names

In Sindarin, the Bay of Belfalas was called Côf Belfalas, or Côf gwaeren Bêl ("the windy Bay of Bêl").[2]

[edit] Etymology

The name Belfalas is composed of Mannish bel + Sindarin falas.[2]

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Adventures of Tom Bombadil, "The Man in the Moon Came Down Too Soon"
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 J.R.R. Tolkien, "The Rivers and Beacon-hills of Gondor" (edited by Carl F. Hostetter), in Vinyar Tengwar, Number 42, July 2001, p. 15
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, "The West of Middle-earth at the End of the Third Age" [map]
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "Of Dwarves and Men", "The Atani and their Languages"
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "Of Dwarves and Men", "Notes", #67
  6. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "The Tale of Years of the Second Age"
  7. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix A, "The Númenorean Kings", "Gondor and the Heirs of Anárion"