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Bree-landers

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{{rewrite}}<!-- EoA rip + perhaps sort out the relations between "Bree-landers", "Big Folk", "Bree-men" and "Men of Bree" (User:Morgan) -->
 
In the [[Bree-land]], [[Men]] and [[Hobbits]] lived peaceably side by side. These two races, identified individually as the [[Bree-hobbits]] and the [[Men of Bree|Bree-men]] (or less formally as the [[Little Folk]] and the [[Big Folk]]) were collectively described as the '''Bree-landers'''. They lived in four communities scattered around the [[Bree-hill]]: [[Bree]] itself, [[Staddle]], [[Combe]] and [[Archet]].  
 
In the [[Bree-land]], [[Men]] and [[Hobbits]] lived peaceably side by side. These two races, identified individually as the [[Bree-hobbits]] and the [[Men of Bree|Bree-men]] (or less formally as the [[Little Folk]] and the [[Big Folk]]) were collectively described as the '''Bree-landers'''. They lived in four communities scattered around the [[Bree-hill]]: [[Bree]] itself, [[Staddle]], [[Combe]] and [[Archet]].  
  

Revision as of 20:19, 3 November 2011

"The wise will stay here and hope to rebuild our town..." — Master of Lake-town
This article needs to be rewritten to comply with Tolkien Gateway's higher standards...

In the Bree-land, Men and Hobbits lived peaceably side by side. These two races, identified individually as the Bree-hobbits and the Bree-men (or less formally as the Little Folk and the Big Folk) were collectively described as the Bree-landers. They lived in four communities scattered around the Bree-hill: Bree itself, Staddle, Combe and Archet.

They were a generally friendly folk, at least until the upheavals brought about by the War of the Ring. They had some dealings with the Shire-hobbits, though the road between Bree and their ancient 'colony' of the Shire was less travelled in the late Third Age than it had once been. The Bree-landers maintained their own dialect and customs, including their own unique calendar.