Tolkien Gateway

Bucklebury

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'''Bucklebury''' was the chief village of [[Buckland]], lying in the shadow of [[Buck Hill]], seat of the [[Master of Buckland]], on the banks of the River [[Brandywine]].
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'''Bucklebury''' was the chief village of [[Buckland]], lying in the shadow of [[Buck Hill]], seat of the [[Master of Buckland]]. It was built about a mile east of the banks of the River [[Brandywine]].<ref>{{FR|Part}}</ref>
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==Etymology==
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The name means Buck-burg, or Buck-town (''buck'' always means male goat or deer).
  
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[[J.R.R. Tolkien|Tolkien]] notes that it's "Buck''le''bury" rather than plain "Buckbury" because the word is either an alteration of earlier ''Bucken-bury'' (Bucken being archaic plural) or a reduction of '''''Buckl'''and''.<ref name="nomen">{{HM|N}}, p. 767</ref>
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{{references}}
 
[[Category:Buckland]]
 
[[Category:Buckland]]
[[Category:Shire]]
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[[Category:Cities, towns and villages]]
[[Category:Cities]]
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[[de:Bockenburg]]
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[[fi:Bukinpuri]]

Latest revision as of 18:22, 13 June 2012

Bucklebury was the chief village of Buckland, lying in the shadow of Buck Hill, seat of the Master of Buckland. It was built about a mile east of the banks of the River Brandywine.[1]

[edit] Etymology

The name means Buck-burg, or Buck-town (buck always means male goat or deer).

Tolkien notes that it's "Bucklebury" rather than plain "Buckbury" because the word is either an alteration of earlier Bucken-bury (Bucken being archaic plural) or a reduction of Buckland.[2]

[edit] References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring, "A Part of the Shire" map
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Nomenclature of The Lord of the Rings" in Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull (eds), The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion, p. 767