Tolkien Gateway

Bywater Road

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The road that left the main [[East Road]] a little to the west of the [[Three-Farthing Stone]], leading to the village of Bywater from which it took its name. From there, it carried on to [[Hobbiton]], where a traveller would turn right and cross a bridge across the Water to reach [[Hobbiton Hill]] and [[Bag End]]. The road itself carried on into the west, in the direction of [[Little Delving]].  
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'''Bywater Road''' left the main [[East Road]] a little to the west of the [[Three-Farthing Stone]], leading to the village of Bywater from which it took its name. From there, it carried on to [[Hobbiton]], where a traveller would turn right and cross a bridge across the Water to reach [[Hobbiton Hill]] and [[Bag End]]. The road itself continued into the west, in the direction of [[Little Delving]].<ref>{{FR|Part}}</ref>
  
[[Category:Roads]]
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Bywater Road sloped upward from the East Road between high banks.  On [[3 November]] {{SR|1419}},<ref>{{App|Chief}}</ref> [[Meriadoc Brandybuck|Merry]] used this feature to trap the band of [[Ruffians]] who came to crush the rebellion of the [[Hobbits]] against [[Sharkey]]'s rule.  Wagons were used to close the trap on either end, which gave the Hobbits the edge in the resulting [[Battle of Bywater]].<ref>{{RK|VI8}}</ref>
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{{references}}
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[[Category:The Shire]]
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[[Category:Roads and streets]]
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[[de:Wasserauer Straße]]
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[[fi:Virranvarren Tie]]

Revision as of 18:41, 13 June 2012

Bywater Road left the main East Road a little to the west of the Three-Farthing Stone, leading to the village of Bywater from which it took its name. From there, it carried on to Hobbiton, where a traveller would turn right and cross a bridge across the Water to reach Hobbiton Hill and Bag End. The road itself continued into the west, in the direction of Little Delving.[1]

Bywater Road sloped upward from the East Road between high banks. On 3 November S.R. 1419,[2] Merry used this feature to trap the band of Ruffians who came to crush the rebellion of the Hobbits against Sharkey's rule. Wagons were used to close the trap on either end, which gave the Hobbits the edge in the resulting Battle of Bywater.[3]

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring, "A Part of the Shire" map
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix B, "The Chief Days from the Fall of Barad-dûr to the End of the Third Age"
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King, "The Scouring of the Shire"