Tolkien Gateway

Caradhras

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{{qtlisten|Lasto Caradhras, sedho, hodo, nuitho i 'ruith!|Sleep Caradhras, be still, lie still, hold your wrath!|[[Gandalf]]|Gandalf - Lasto Caradhras, sedho, hodo, nuitho i 'ruith.ogg}}
 
 
{{Pronounce|Caradhras.mp3|Ardamir}}
 
{{Pronounce|Caradhras.mp3|Ardamir}}
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{{qtlisten|Lasto Caradhras, sedho, hodo, nuitho i 'ruith!|Sleep Caradhras, be still, lie still, hold your wrath!|[[Gandalf]]|Gandalf - Lasto Caradhras, sedho, hodo, nuitho i 'ruith.ogg}}
 
'''Caradhras''', also called the '''Redhorn''' (the literal English translation of the [[Sindarin]] name), is one of the mightiest peaks in the [[Misty Mountains]].
 
'''Caradhras''', also called the '''Redhorn''' (the literal English translation of the [[Sindarin]] name), is one of the mightiest peaks in the [[Misty Mountains]].
  
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Caradhras (in [[Khuzdul]], the language of the [[Dwarves]], '''''Baranzibar''''') was one of the [[Mountains of Moria]], the three mountains which the great [[Dwarves|Dwarf]] palace of [[Khazad-dûm]] was built under. Caradhras was also the site on Middle-earth where [[Mithril]] was found. It was here, though, that [[Durin's folk|miners]] found [[Durin's Bane]], the [[Balrogs|Balrog]] of [[Moria]].
 
Caradhras (in [[Khuzdul]], the language of the [[Dwarves]], '''''Baranzibar''''') was one of the [[Mountains of Moria]], the three mountains which the great [[Dwarves|Dwarf]] palace of [[Khazad-dûm]] was built under. Caradhras was also the site on Middle-earth where [[Mithril]] was found. It was here, though, that [[Durin's folk|miners]] found [[Durin's Bane]], the [[Balrogs|Balrog]] of [[Moria]].
  
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[[Image:John Howe - The Company Approaches Caradhras.jpg|thumb|left|250px|''The Company Approaches Caradhras'' by [[John Howe]].]]
 
Caradhras was called ''the Cruel'' by the Dwarves and had long had a bad reputation. The Redhorn Pass (also called the ''Redhorn Gate'') was known to be treacherous. It was on this pass that [[Celebrían]], the wife of [[Elrond]], was captured by orcs. This was also the pass used by the hobbits migrating from [[Gladden Fields]] into [[Eriador]].
 
Caradhras was called ''the Cruel'' by the Dwarves and had long had a bad reputation. The Redhorn Pass (also called the ''Redhorn Gate'') was known to be treacherous. It was on this pass that [[Celebrían]], the wife of [[Elrond]], was captured by orcs. This was also the pass used by the hobbits migrating from [[Gladden Fields]] into [[Eriador]].
  

Revision as of 23:02, 18 April 2006

"Lasto Caradhras, sedho, hodo, nuitho i 'ruith!"
(Sleep Caradhras, be still, lie still, hold your wrath!)
Gandalf(audio)Listen

Caradhras, also called the Redhorn (the literal English translation of the Sindarin name), is one of the mightiest peaks in the Misty Mountains.

The Redhorn Pass attempted by the Nine Walkers on their quest for Mount Doom lay beneath its slopes, linking the former Noldorin realm of Eregion in the west to the Dimrill Dale and hence the Vale of Anduin in the east.

After the fall of Khazad-dûm, this pass was predominantly used by elves travelling between Lorien and Eriador.

Caradhras (in Khuzdul, the language of the Dwarves, Baranzibar) was one of the Mountains of Moria, the three mountains which the great Dwarf palace of Khazad-dûm was built under. Caradhras was also the site on Middle-earth where Mithril was found. It was here, though, that miners found Durin's Bane, the Balrog of Moria.

The Company Approaches Caradhras by John Howe.

Caradhras was called the Cruel by the Dwarves and had long had a bad reputation. The Redhorn Pass (also called the Redhorn Gate) was known to be treacherous. It was on this pass that Celebrían, the wife of Elrond, was captured by orcs. This was also the pass used by the hobbits migrating from Gladden Fields into Eriador.

In Peter Jackson's The Fellowship of the Ring movie, when the Fellowship is trying to cross Caradhras, Saruman conjures a spell that causes violent snowstorms on the mountain. In the book, the Company generally blames the mountain itself.