Tolkien Gateway

Celebdil

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{{mountain
| image=[[Image:John Howe - Zirak-zigil.jpg|250px|The battle between [[Gandalf]] and [[Durin's Bane]] atop Celebdil as depicted by [[John Howe]].]]
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| image=[[Image:John Howe - Zirak-zigil.jpg|250px]]
 
| name=Celebdil
 
| name=Celebdil
 
| location=above [[Khazad-dûm]], south of [[Caradhras]] and [[Fanuidhol]], on the border between [[Eriador]] and [[Rhovanion (region)|Rhovanion]]
 
| location=above [[Khazad-dûm]], south of [[Caradhras]] and [[Fanuidhol]], on the border between [[Eriador]] and [[Rhovanion (region)|Rhovanion]]
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| events=final struggle between [[Gandalf]] and [[Durin's Bane]]
 
| events=final struggle between [[Gandalf]] and [[Durin's Bane]]
 
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| references=
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'''Silvertine''', also called '''Celebdil''' and '''Zirakzigil''' (the literal [[Westron]] and [[Khuzdul]] translations of the [[Sindarin]] name), was one of the three peaks that stood above the [[Dwarves|Dwarven]] city of [[Khazad-dûm]]. The other two were [[Caradhras]] (''Redhorn'') and [[Fanuidhol]] (''Cloudyhead'').
 
'''Silvertine''', also called '''Celebdil''' and '''Zirakzigil''' (the literal [[Westron]] and [[Khuzdul]] translations of the [[Sindarin]] name), was one of the three peaks that stood above the [[Dwarves|Dwarven]] city of [[Khazad-dûm]]. The other two were [[Caradhras]] (''Redhorn'') and [[Fanuidhol]] (''Cloudyhead'').
  
 
Celebdil was the southernmost of the [[Mountains of Moria]] and the [[Endless Stair]] led from the deepest halls of Khazad-dûm up to [[Durin's Tower]] on the peak of the mountain. There the final battle between [[Gandalf]] and [[Durin's Bane]] took place.<ref name="White Rider">{{HM|TT}}, "[[The White Rider]]"</ref>
 
Celebdil was the southernmost of the [[Mountains of Moria]] and the [[Endless Stair]] led from the deepest halls of Khazad-dûm up to [[Durin's Tower]] on the peak of the mountain. There the final battle between [[Gandalf]] and [[Durin's Bane]] took place.<ref name="White Rider">{{HM|TT}}, "[[The White Rider]]"</ref>
 
==Etymology==
 
==Etymology==
The element contains ''tine'' "spike, sharp horn"
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The element contains ''tine'', "spike, sharp horn".<ref name="Nomen">{{HM|N}}, p. 775</ref>
  
It is a translation of [[Sindarin]] ''[[Celebdil]]'' and [[Khuzdul]] ''[[Zirakzigil]]''
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It is a translation of [[Sindarin]] ''[[Celebdil]]'' and [[Khuzdul]] ''[[Zirakzigil]]''.
  
 
{{references}}
 
{{references}}
 
[[Category:Mountains]]
 
[[Category:Mountains]]
 
 
[[de:Celebdil]]
 
[[de:Celebdil]]
 
[[fi:Celebdil]]
 
[[fi:Celebdil]]
 
[[fr:encyclo:geographie:reliefs:monts_brumeux:celebdil]]
 
[[fr:encyclo:geographie:reliefs:monts_brumeux:celebdil]]

Revision as of 16:30, 14 October 2010

John Howe - Zirak-zigil.jpg
Celebdil
Physical Description
Locationabove Khazad-dûm, south of Caradhras and Fanuidhol, on the border between Eriador and Rhovanion
belongs to...the Misty Mountains
General Information
Other namesCelebdil (Sindarin), Zirakzigil (Khuzdul)
EtymologyCelebdil: celeb - silver, dil - horn
Zirakzigil: zirak - spike, zigil - silver
Eventsfinal struggle between Gandalf and Durin's Bane

Silvertine, also called Celebdil and Zirakzigil (the literal Westron and Khuzdul translations of the Sindarin name), was one of the three peaks that stood above the Dwarven city of Khazad-dûm. The other two were Caradhras (Redhorn) and Fanuidhol (Cloudyhead).

Celebdil was the southernmost of the Mountains of Moria and the Endless Stair led from the deepest halls of Khazad-dûm up to Durin's Tower on the peak of the mountain. There the final battle between Gandalf and Durin's Bane took place.[1]

Etymology

The element contains tine, "spike, sharp horn".[2]

It is a translation of Sindarin Celebdil and Khuzdul Zirakzigil.

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Two Towers, "The White Rider"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Nomenclature of The Lord of the Rings" in Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull (eds), The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion, p. 775