Tolkien Gateway

Crickhollow

Revision as of 12:47, 6 August 2012 by Sage (Talk | contribs)
Crickhollow by Matěj Čadil

Crickhollow was a small village in Buckland, located a short way to the northeast of Brandy Hall.[1] The house that Frodo Baggins bought in the village was quite isolated: It stood back from the lane in the middle of a wide lawn surrounded by low trees inside an outer hedge, and there were no other dwellings nearby. It occasionally was occupied with those who grew tired of the often crowded Brandy Hall.[2]

Contents

History

In the summer of T.A. 3018, Frodo Baggins bought a house of the Brandybuck family in Crickhollow. His reason was to find an excuse for leaving Hobbiton to the east.[3]

On 25 September, Frodo, Sam, and Pippin arrived at the lodgings, where Merry and Fatty Bolger had prepared for their arrival. The next day Frodo and his party departed for the Old Forest while Fatty stayed at Crickhollow to maintain the pretense that Frodo was still in residence.[2]

In the early hours of 30 September three Black Riders came to the house in Crickhollow,[4] but Fatty Bolger had already escaped. He had run to the nearest house from where the news of an invasion had gone swiftly to Brandy Hall, which resulted in the rousing of the hobbits of Buckland.[5]

Etymology

Tolkien noted that the first element is obsolete of obscure meaning. A hollow is a depression in the ground.[6]

Portrayals in Adaptations

2007: The Lord of the Rings Online:

Crickhollow is visted by the player during Stirrings in the Darkness.

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring, "A Part of the Shire" map
  2. 2.0 2.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring, "A Conspiracy Unmasked"
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring, "Three is Company"
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix B, "The Great Years"
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring, "A Knife in the Dark"
  6. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Nomenclature of The Lord of the Rings" in Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull (eds), The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion, p. 758