Tolkien Gateway

Echoriad

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The '''Echoriath''' or '''Echoriad''', meaning '''Encircling Mountains''' were a mountain range in the north of [[Beleriand]].
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The '''Echoriath''' or '''Echoriad''', the '''Encircling Mountains''',<ref>{{S|Index}}</ref> were a mountain range in the north of [[Beleriand]].
  
 
The Echoriath formed a natural circle of rock, enclosing the valley later called [[Tumladen]], within which lay the [[Elves|Elven]] city of [[Gondolin]]. A hidden ravine provided the only access through the Echoriath &mdash; a way guarded by seven gates.
 
The Echoriath formed a natural circle of rock, enclosing the valley later called [[Tumladen]], within which lay the [[Elves|Elven]] city of [[Gondolin]]. A hidden ravine provided the only access through the Echoriath &mdash; a way guarded by seven gates.

Revision as of 12:09, 20 July 2011

The Echoriath or Echoriad, the Encircling Mountains,[1] were a mountain range in the north of Beleriand.

The Echoriath formed a natural circle of rock, enclosing the valley later called Tumladen, within which lay the Elven city of Gondolin. A hidden ravine provided the only access through the Echoriath — a way guarded by seven gates.

Etymology

Echoriath is Sindarin. It means "encircling fence", from echor "encircling" and iâth "fence".[2]

Christopher Tolkien mentioned that his father's intent was to rename the Echoriath as Echoriad, but perhaps this knowledge eluded him while publishing The Silmarillion.[3]

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Index of Names"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Appendix: Elements in Quenya and Sindarin Names", entries echor and iâth
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "Part Three. The Wanderings of Húrin and Other Writings not forming part of the Quenta Silmarillion: I. The Wanderings of Húrin", note 27