Tolkien Gateway

Echoriad

(Difference between revisions)
(Etymology)
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The Echoriath formed a natural circle of rock, enclosing the valley later called [[Tumladen]], within which lay the [[Elves|Elven]] city of [[Gondolin]]. A hidden ravine provided the only access through the Echoriath — a way guarded by seven gates.
 
The Echoriath formed a natural circle of rock, enclosing the valley later called [[Tumladen]], within which lay the [[Elves|Elven]] city of [[Gondolin]]. A hidden ravine provided the only access through the Echoriath — a way guarded by seven gates.
 
==Etymology==
 
==Etymology==
Echoriath means something like 'outer circle fence' and can be analyzed as et-cor-iath. Cf. [[Rammas Echor]].
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Echoriath means something like 'outer circle fence' and can be analyzed as et-cor-iath. Cf. [[Rammas Echor]] and [[Doriath]].
  
 
[[Christopher Tolkien]] mentioned that his father's intent was to rename the Echoriath as ''Echoriad'', but perhaps this knowledge eluded him while publishing ''[[The Silmarillion]]''.
 
[[Christopher Tolkien]] mentioned that his father's intent was to rename the Echoriath as ''Echoriad'', but perhaps this knowledge eluded him while publishing ''[[The Silmarillion]]''.
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In that case, ''echoriad'' could be a gerundic form of a verb, possibly meaning 'encircling'.
 
[[Category:Mountains]]
 
[[Category:Mountains]]
 
[[Category:Beleriand]]
 
[[Category:Beleriand]]

Revision as of 00:49, 5 August 2008

The Echoriath or Encircling Mountains were a mountain range in the north of Beleriand.

The Echoriath formed a natural circle of rock, enclosing the valley later called Tumladen, within which lay the Elven city of Gondolin. A hidden ravine provided the only access through the Echoriath — a way guarded by seven gates.

Etymology

Echoriath means something like 'outer circle fence' and can be analyzed as et-cor-iath. Cf. Rammas Echor and Doriath.

Christopher Tolkien mentioned that his father's intent was to rename the Echoriath as Echoriad, but perhaps this knowledge eluded him while publishing The Silmarillion.

In that case, echoriad could be a gerundic form of a verb, possibly meaning 'encircling'.