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Forum:Dagor dagorath

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When does the Last Battle take place? In other words, how many years does the Fourth Age take place?--Aragorn47 00:22, 21 October 2008 (UTC)

The Fourth Age isn't the last! Tolkien's stories take place in the mythical past of our own world, and we are currently in a subsequent Age. From Wikipedia:
Tolkien said that he thought the time between the end of the Third Age and the 20th century AD was about 6000 years, and that in AD 1958 it should have been around the end of the Fifth Age if the Fourth and Fifth Ages were about the same length as the Second and Third Ages. He said, however, in a letter written in 1958 that he believed the Ages had quickened and that it was about the end of the Sixth Age/beginning of the Seventh.
So you see the Dagor Dagorath is still to come. It will happen whenever Morgoth discovers how to free himself. It could be tomorrow! :P --Aule the Smith 11:00, 21 October 2008 (UTC)
Indeed, we are all waiting for the Final Battle to arrive.
On the issue of the current age, some people have speculated that the Fifth Age began with, perhaps the foundation of Rome (Rome being geographically close to Minas Tirith on the super-imposed map of Middle-earth), the Sixth Age began, unsurprisingly, with the birth of Christ, and the Seventh Age began with the fall of Nazi Germany and a new world order in 1945 (or the collapse of Soviet Russia and the end of the Cold War). I have seen people claim that the current year could be "Se.A. 63".
None of this is actually canonical, but just fascinating to ponder on. --Mith (Talk/Contribs/Edits) 20:32, 21 October 2008 (UTC)
Did Tolkien write about this in any books? I guess I assumed we were part of Arda Unmarred, since the geography of Middle-earth and the earth we live in are completely different. Although he did set some of his earliest stories in England... I'm going to be thinking about this for a while.--Aragorn47 01:26, 17 January 2009 (UTC)