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Galdor of the Tree

"there are Tolkien's latest thoughts, his best thoughts, and his published thoughts and these are not necessarily the same." — Tolkien's Legendarium
This article is non-canon.
The name Galdor refers to more than one character, item or concept. For a list of other meanings, see Galdor (disambiguation).
Galdor
Elf
Biographical Information
TitlesLord of the House of the Tree
LocationGondolin
LanguageQuenya, Sindarin
Physical Description
GenderMale

Galdor was an Elf, who lived in Gondolin during the First Age, and was the leader of the Folk of the Tree. He was said to be the bravest Elf of Gondolin, save King Turgon himself.[1] He carried either a great club or spear, and wore green. After the Fall of Gondolin he fled southwards to the Mouths of Sirion, after leading the scouts before the exiles on their escape. It is said he later returned to the Undying Lands, and dwelt on Tol Eressëa.[2]

[edit] Other versions of the Legendarium

In late writings, Tolkien considered that Galdor of the Trees and Galdor of the Havens may have been the same,[3] but ultimately rejected the notion. If Galdor had remained behind, he would either have completely rejected the call of the Valar, and thus had fallen, or he would have had to leave and then return like Glorfindel did, which would make him a far more powerful person than his appearance in The Lord of the Rings suggests.[4] For this reason Tolkien speculated that "Galdor" was simply a common Sindarin name.

[edit] References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part Two, "The Fall of Gondolin"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part Two, "The Fall of Gondolin": "Notes and Commentary"
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "Last Writings", Glorfindel, note 1
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Peoples of Middle-earth, "Last Writings", Glorfindel, note 3