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Gandalf's Song of Lórien

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'''Gandalf's Song of Lórien''' was sung by [[Gandalf]] in [[Meduseld]], as an answer to [[Gríma|Gríma Wormtongue]]'s insulting claim that "webs of deceit were ever woven in [[Dwimordene]]".
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'''Gandalf's Song of Lórien''' was sung by [[Gandalf]] in [[Meduseld]] on [[2 March]] {{TA|3019}}<ref>{{App|Great}}</ref>, as an answer to [[Gríma|Gríma Wormtongue]]'s insulting claim that "webs of deceit were ever woven in [[Dwimordene]]".<ref>{{TT|III6}}</ref>
  
 
==Song==
 
==Song==
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Unmarred, unstained is leaf and land
 
Unmarred, unstained is leaf and land
 
In Dwimordene, in Lórien
 
In Dwimordene, in Lórien
More fair than thought of Mortal Men.
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More fair than thoughts of Mortal Men.
 
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</poem>
  
==References==
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{{References}}
 
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*[[J.R.R. Tolkien]], ''[[The Lord of the Rings]]'', ''[[The Two Towers]]'', "[[The King of the Golden Hall]]"
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[[Category:Songs]]
 
[[Category:Songs]]

Latest revision as of 08:15, 8 July 2014

"Tell me, who are you, alone, yourself and nameless?" - Tom Bombadil
This article describes a concept which is mentioned in J.R.R. Tolkien's works, but was never given a definite name.

Gandalf's Song of Lórien was sung by Gandalf in Meduseld on 2 March T.A. 3019[1], as an answer to Gríma Wormtongue's insulting claim that "webs of deceit were ever woven in Dwimordene".[2]

[edit] Song

In Dwimordene, in Lórien
Seldom have walked the feet of Men,
Few mortal eyes have seen the light
That lies there ever, long and bright.
Galadriel! Galadriel!
Clear is the water of your well;
White is the star in your white hand;
Unmarred, unstained is leaf and land
In Dwimordene, in Lórien
More fair than thoughts of Mortal Men.

[edit] References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix B, "The Great Years"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Two Towers, "The King of the Golden Hall"