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Glóin

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This article is about the father of Gimli. For the the King of Durin's Folk, see Glóin (Son of Thorin I).
Angelo Montanini - Gloin.jpg
Glóin
Dwarf
Family
ParentageGróin
Physical Description
GenderMale
"'Welcome and well met!' said the dwarf, turning towards him. Then he actually rose from his seat and bowed. 'Glóin, at your service,' he said, and bowed still lower."
The Fellowship of the Ring, Many Meetings

Glóin (Third Age 2783 – Fourth Age 15, aged 253 years), was a dwarf of Durin's folk, the son of Gróin, the brother of Óin, and the father of Gimli of the Fellowship of the Ring.

Contents

History

Youth

Not much is known about Glóin's youth, but he was likely born in Dunland, where the Dwarves of Durin's Line dwelt in exile. He fought in the War of the Dwarves and Orcs, or at least in the Battle of Azanulbizar. Which is odd because Dwarves were usually battle-ready at the age of 30, and Glóin was, at the end of the war, only 19.

Not long after the end of the war, the exiled Dwarves came to the northern Blue Mountains where they settled.

Life in Thorin's Halls

During Glóin's life in Ered Luin he saw the departure of King Thráin, who tried to go back to Erebor, but was captured and tortured for the Ring of Thrór, and subsequently died several years later. But Glóin's life was pleasant in those lands. Under King Thorin they had fair halls in the mountains, and became prosperous in a fashion and trafficked goods with other peoples, and gained what wealth they could. But ever they spoke of the Lonely Mountain.

The Quest of Erebor

After nearly a hundred years of living in the Blue Mountains King Thorin happened to meet Gandalf the Wizard. They both came up with a plan to retake the Lonely Mountain from Smaug the Dragon. Before Thorin left his halls, he selected twelve Dwarves to come with him, among them being Glóin and his brother, Óin. When Thorin and company observed the "burglar" Gandalf had picked named Bilbo Baggins, they were not impressed, and were ready to leave. But the Wizard convinced them to give the Hobbit one more chance. A couple days later, they were in Bilbo's home at Bag End, where they discussed their quest. Once morning came around they set out for Erebor. On their quest Glóin was quite useful, especially at making fires. He tended to be very cross with Bilbo, but as their journey went on and the Hobbit rescued them several times he grew an affection for Bilbo.

Months later they reached Erebor. And once word reached their ears that the Dragon was dead, and that a host of Elves from Mirkwood and Lake-men were coming for wealth they sat up defenses. Not much later they came out of the mountain to help the Elves, Men, and their kinsfolk from the Iron Hills fight the Orcs and Wargs in the Battle of Five Armies.

Glóin survived the battle, was given his share of the treasure by Dáin II Ironfoot, who became King after Thorin's death. He settled in the Lonely Mountain.

Erebor and the War of the Ring

Years later, he was present with his son, Gimli, at the Council of Elrond. It is possible that Glóin fought in the Battle of Dale during the War of the Ring.

He died in the 15th year of the Fourth Age.

Etymology

Glóinn is a dwarf in the Dvergatal. The name means "Glowing one".[1]

Genealogy

 
 
 
 
 
 
Farin
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fundin
 
 
 
 
 
Gróin
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Balin
 
Dwalin
 
Óin
 
GLÓIN
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gimli


Portrayal in adaptations

1955: The Lord of the Rings (1956 radio series):

Glóin was present in the very first adaptation, but no actor was specified. He was, according to J.R.R. Tolkien, "someone's idea of a German". Tolkien thought he was not too bad, though a bit exaggerated.

1966: The Hobbit (1966 film):

Glóin is omitted. Thorin Oakenshield only travels with an unnamed guard and the princess of Dale.[2]

1977: The Hobbit (1977 film):

Glóin is one of the minor Dwarves, voiced by Jack DeLeon. Like in the book, he has little lines other than the usual grunts. He is one of the Dwarves who survives the Battle of Five Armies.

1968: The Hobbit (1968 radio series):

Peter Baldwin plays Glóin.

1978: The Lord of the Rings (1978 film):

Glóin is not present; his role at the council has been taken by Gimli.

1981: The Lord of the Rings (1981 radio series):

Glóin is not present; his role at the council has been taken by Gimli.

1982: The Hobbit (1982 video game):

Glóin is omitted; Thorin is the only companion of the player, Bilbo Baggins.[3]

2001: The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring:

On a Decipher Card, Glóin is identified as the white-haired Dwarf that enters Rivendell with Gimli, but he is not present at the Council of Elrond.

2003: The Hobbit (2003 video game):

Glóin is voiced by an unspecified actor; he is portrayed as an intelligent dwarf with a black beard. He mentions his son Gimli, and how Bilbo reminds him of his son.

2006: The Lord of the Rings: The Battle for Middle-earth II:

Glóin is a major character. Still present in Rivendell after the Council of Elrond, he teams up with Glorfindel on a campaign throughout Eriador and Rhovanion. He is a fierce dwarf with a reddish brown beard.
2007: The Lord of the Rings Online:
Glóin is a non-playable character who established a camp just north of Rivendell in the Misty Mountains in an attempt to keep Goblins and Dourhands from attacking the Elven city.

2012-3: The Hobbit films:

Glóin will be played by Peter Hambleton.[4]

See Also

References

  1. Chester Nathan Gould, "Dwarf-Names: A Study in Old Icelandic Religion", published in Publications of the Modern Language Association of America, Vol 44 (1929), issue #4, pp. 939-967
  2. "The Hobbit.mp4" dated 05 January 2012, YouTube (accessed 10 January 2012)
  3. ZX Computing, 8304 (April/May 1983), p. 76 <http://www.worldofspectrum.org/showmag.cgi?mag=ZXComputing/Issue8304/Pages/ZXComputing830400076.jpg> [accessed 24 March 2011]
  4. Peter Jackson, "Production begins in New Zealand on The Hobbit" dated 20 March 2011, Facebook (accessed 23 December 2011)

References

  1. Chester Nathan Gould, "Dwarf-Names: A Study in Old Icelandic Religion", published in Publications of the Modern Language Association of America, Vol 44 (1929), issue #4, pp. 939-967
  2. "The Hobbit.mp4" dated 05 January 2012, YouTube (accessed 10 January 2012)
  3. ZX Computing, 8304 (April/May 1983), p. 76 <http://www.worldofspectrum.org/showmag.cgi?mag=ZXComputing/Issue8304/Pages/ZXComputing830400076.jpg> [accessed 24 March 2011]
  4. Peter Jackson, "Production begins in New Zealand on The Hobbit" dated 20 March 2011, Facebook (accessed 23 December 2011)


Members of Thorin and Company
Thorin · Balin · Dwalin · Fíli · Kíli · Dori · Nori · Ori · Óin · Glóin · Bifur · Bofur · Bombur · Gandalf · Bilbo Baggins