Tolkien Gateway

Goblins

(Difference between revisions)
(image link + minor tweaks)
Line 1: Line 1:
 
:''For the main article on this subject, see '''[[Orcs]]'''.''
 
:''For the main article on this subject, see '''[[Orcs]]'''.''
'''Goblins''' is another name for [[Orcs]]<ref>{{L|131}}</ref><ref>{{L|144}}</ref>.
+
[[Image:Grey Mountain Goblins.jpg|thumb|''Grey Mountain Goblins'' by [[Liz Danforth]]]]
 +
'''Goblins''' was another name for [[Orcs]].<ref>{{L|131}}</ref><ref>{{L|144}}</ref>
  
 
The term was used primarily in ''[[The Hobbit]]'' but also in ''[[The Lord of the Rings]]'' where it is used synonymously with "Orc".<ref>{{TT|III1}}</ref>
 
The term was used primarily in ''[[The Hobbit]]'' but also in ''[[The Lord of the Rings]]'' where it is used synonymously with "Orc".<ref>{{TT|III1}}</ref>
  
 
==Etymology==
 
==Etymology==
Goblin is a folk word, which according to "The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Current English," is probably derived from the Anglo-French ''gobelin'' a diminutive of Gobel (cf. Kobold). It is a Romance-derived word, unlike other Germanic words preferable by Tolkien<ref>http://tolkien.slimy.com/tfaq/EnemyMisc.html#Orcs</ref>
+
Goblin is a folk word, which according to "The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Current English," is probably derived from the Anglo-French ''gobelin'' a diminutive of Gobel (cf. Kobold). It is a Romance-derived word, unlike other Germanic words preferable by Tolkien.<ref>http://tolkien.slimy.com/tfaq/EnemyMisc.html#Orcs</ref>
  
It's possible that ''goblin'' is the [[Hobbitish]] name of the creatures, as opposed to the "pure" [[Rohirric]] ''Orc'' which is [[Old English]].<ref>{{App|F1ii}}</ref>
+
It is possible that ''goblin'' is the [[Hobbitish]] name of the creatures, as opposed to the "pure" [[Rohirric]] ''Orc'' which is [[Old English]].<ref>{{App|F1ii}}</ref>
  
 
==Portrayal in Adaptations==
 
==Portrayal in Adaptations==
 
'''2003: ''[[The Lord of the Rings: War of the Ring]]'':'''
 
'''2003: ''[[The Lord of the Rings: War of the Ring]]'':'''
:Goblins have been made clearly distinct from Orcs
+
:Goblins have been made clearly distinct from Orcs.
  
 
'''2006: ''[[The Lord of the Rings: The Battle for Middle-earth II]]'':'''
 
'''2006: ''[[The Lord of the Rings: The Battle for Middle-earth II]]'':'''
:Goblins have been made clearly distinct from Orcs
+
:Goblins have been made clearly distinct from Orcs.
  
 
'''2007: ''[[The Lord of the Rings Online]]'':'''
 
'''2007: ''[[The Lord of the Rings Online]]'':'''
 
:Goblins are small in stature; a little shorter then [[Hobbits]]. In contracts, Orcs are about the size of [[Men]]. Goblins are also weaker then the orcs.  
 
:Goblins are small in stature; a little shorter then [[Hobbits]]. In contracts, Orcs are about the size of [[Men]]. Goblins are also weaker then the orcs.  
 
+
==See also==
 +
*[[:Category:Images of Goblins|Images of Goblins]]
 
{{references}}
 
{{references}}
 
 
[[Category:Races]]
 
[[Category:Races]]
 
[[Category:Orcs]]
 
[[Category:Orcs]]

Revision as of 23:08, 15 November 2010

For the main article on this subject, see Orcs.

Goblins was another name for Orcs.[1][2]

The term was used primarily in The Hobbit but also in The Lord of the Rings where it is used synonymously with "Orc".[3]

Contents

Etymology

Goblin is a folk word, which according to "The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Current English," is probably derived from the Anglo-French gobelin a diminutive of Gobel (cf. Kobold). It is a Romance-derived word, unlike other Germanic words preferable by Tolkien.[4]

It is possible that goblin is the Hobbitish name of the creatures, as opposed to the "pure" Rohirric Orc which is Old English.[5]

Portrayal in Adaptations

2003: The Lord of the Rings: War of the Ring:

Goblins have been made clearly distinct from Orcs.

2006: The Lord of the Rings: The Battle for Middle-earth II:

Goblins have been made clearly distinct from Orcs.

2007: The Lord of the Rings Online:

Goblins are small in stature; a little shorter then Hobbits. In contracts, Orcs are about the size of Men. Goblins are also weaker then the orcs.

See also

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien; Humphrey Carpenter, Christopher Tolkien (eds.), The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien, Letter 131, (undated, written late 1951)
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien; Humphrey Carpenter, Christopher Tolkien (eds.), The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien, Letter 144, (dated 25 April 1954)
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Two Towers, "The Departure of Boromir"
  4. http://tolkien.slimy.com/tfaq/EnemyMisc.html#Orcs
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix F, "The Languages and Peoples of the Third Age", "Of Men"