Tolkien Gateway

Halad

(Difference between revisions)
(Etymology)
Line 16: Line 16:
 
{{References}}
 
{{References}}
 
[[Category:House of Haleth| ]]
 
[[Category:House of Haleth| ]]
[[Category:Titles]]
+
[[Category:Mannish titles]]
 
[[Category:Rulers in Beleriand]]
 
[[Category:Rulers in Beleriand]]

Revision as of 14:44, 4 January 2012

"a complete consistency [...] is not to be looked for, and could only be achieved, if at all, at heavy and needless cost." — Christopher Tolkien
This article's canonicity is disputed.

Halad or "Warden" was the title of the Chieftain of Brethil who was the leader of the Folk of Haleth. The Halad's residence was called Obel Halad.[1] When spoken of in a general way this official was called "The Halad";[2] when name and title were spoken the title came second, as in "Hardang Halad".[3] His duties included command of the armed men of the land[1] and leadership of the Folkmoot, the gatherings of the people called to make important decisions.[4]

The position of the Halad was elective, chosen by the people of Brethil, but by custom all chieftains had come from the House of Haleth.[1] After Brandir the Lame had died in F.A. 499[5] there was some contention in Brethil concerning who should become the next Halad. Many had wished to elect Manthor but Hardang came from the senior branch of the family under Halmir and obtained the title.[6]

Other Versions of the Legendarium

All of the information about the office of the Halad comes from The Wanderings of Húrin in The War of the Jewels. This was a late-written story that Christopher Tolkien regretfully chose not to use in The Silmarillion.

In a section not included in the story it was stated that Avranc, not of the House of Haleth, was chosen for the next Halad but that the authority and reverence of the office was gone.[7]

In an isolated note J.R.R. Tolkien had written possible name changes. One would have substituted Halbar for Halad.[8]

Etymology

Since the chieftains of Brethil were elected from the family of Haldad it was natural to used the term "Halad" for the position. Haldad's name meant "watchdog" and was derived from hal(a), meaning "watch" or "guard".[6]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "Part Three. The Wanderings of Húrin and Other Writings not forming part of the Quenta Silmarillion: I. The Wanderings of Húrin", p. 263
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "Part Three. The Wanderings of Húrin and Other Writings not forming part of the Quenta Silmarillion: I. The Wanderings of Húrin", p. 275
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "Part Three. The Wanderings of Húrin and Other Writings not forming part of the Quenta Silmarillion: I. The Wanderings of Húrin", p. 276
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "Part Three. The Wanderings of Húrin and Other Writings not forming part of the Quenta Silmarillion: I. The Wanderings of Húrin", p. 283
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "Part Two. The Later Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Coming of Men into the West (Chapter 14)", (iii) The Haladin, p. 237
  6. 6.0 6.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "Part Three. The Wanderings of Húrin and Other Writings not forming part of the Quenta Silmarillion: I. The Wanderings of Húrin", p. 270
  7. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "Part Three. The Wanderings of Húrin and Other Writings not forming part of the Quenta Silmarillion: I. The Wanderings of Húrin", note 54, p. 308
  8. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "Part Three. The Wanderings of Húrin and Other Writings not forming part of the Quenta Silmarillion: I. The Wanderings of Húrin", note 55, p. 309