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Herblore of the Shire

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m (Placed in Category: Object, i know strictly speaking it isnt but we dont really have a category for in-universe writings)
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After his return from the [[War of the Ring]], [[Merry Brandybuck]] became well known among the [[Shire-hobbits]] for his writing. Among his works were discussions of calendars and place-names, but perhaps most important was his Herblore of the Shire. In that book, he discussed the origins and history of the [[Hobbits]]' 'art' of smoking [[Pipe-weed]], tracing it back through [[Tobold Hornblower]] (who introduced it to the Shire) to its ultimate origins in [[Middle-earth]], in the lands along the southern banks of the [[Anduin]]. In the Shire, in fact, Merry's reputation rested more on books like Herblore of the Shire than on his adventures in the distant War.
 
After his return from the [[War of the Ring]], [[Merry Brandybuck]] became well known among the [[Shire-hobbits]] for his writing. Among his works were discussions of calendars and place-names, but perhaps most important was his Herblore of the Shire. In that book, he discussed the origins and history of the [[Hobbits]]' 'art' of smoking [[Pipe-weed]], tracing it back through [[Tobold Hornblower]] (who introduced it to the Shire) to its ultimate origins in [[Middle-earth]], in the lands along the southern banks of the [[Anduin]]. In the Shire, in fact, Merry's reputation rested more on books like Herblore of the Shire than on his adventures in the distant War.
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[[Category: Objects]]

Revision as of 16:54, 21 September 2007

After his return from the War of the Ring, Merry Brandybuck became well known among the Shire-hobbits for his writing. Among his works were discussions of calendars and place-names, but perhaps most important was his Herblore of the Shire. In that book, he discussed the origins and history of the Hobbits' 'art' of smoking Pipe-weed, tracing it back through Tobold Hornblower (who introduced it to the Shire) to its ultimate origins in Middle-earth, in the lands along the southern banks of the Anduin. In the Shire, in fact, Merry's reputation rested more on books like Herblore of the Shire than on his adventures in the distant War.