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Herumor

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{{disambig-two|the [[Black Númenóreans|Black Númenórean]]|character in ''[[The New Shadow]]''|[[Herumor (The New Shadow)]]}}
'''Herumor''' was a [[Black Númenóreans|Black Númenórean]] who lived in the late [[Second Age]].
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{{numenorean infobox
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| name=Herumor
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| location=[[Númenor]]; [[Umbar]]
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| affiliation=[[Black Númenóreans]]
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| birth=Late [[Second Age]]
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| gender=Male
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'''Herumor''' was a [[Black Númenóreans|Black Númenórean]] who lived in the late [[Second Age]]. After the [[Downfall of Númenor]] he, along with [[Fuinur]], rose to power among the [[Haradrim]] and served [[Sauron]].<ref>{{S|Rings}}</ref>
  
Herumor is mentioned only once in the main [[legendarium]]:
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== Etymology ==
{{quote|...because of the power of [[Gil-galad]] these renegades, lords both mighty and evil, for the most part took up their abodes in the southlands far away; yet two there were, Herumor and [[Fuinur]], who rose to power amongst the [[Haradrim]], a great and cruel people that dwelt in the wide lands south of [[Mordor]] beyond the mouths of [[Anduin]].|"[[Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age]]", ''[[The Silmarillion]]''}}
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== The New Shadow ==
 
In "[[The New Shadow]]", a short tale included in ''[[The Peoples of Middle-earth]]'', Herumor is also the name of the leader of a growing evil cult in [[Gondor]] during the [[Fourth Age]] about one hundred years into the reign of [[Eldarion]], the son of [[Aragorn II|Aragorn]]. This Herumor could be the same as the [[Númenóreans|Númenórean]] ruler of the [[Haradrim]], as there is some speculation that he became either one of the [[Ringwraiths]] or the [[Mouth of Sauron]].
 
 
== Etymology ==
 
 
Herumor means "Black Lord" in [[Quenya]] (from ''[[heru]]'' = "lord" and ''[[morë]]'' = "dark").
 
Herumor means "Black Lord" in [[Quenya]] (from ''[[heru]]'' = "lord" and ''[[morë]]'' = "dark").
  
== Other Versions of the Legendarium ==
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== Portrayal in Adaptations ==
In the defunct [[Middle-earth Role Playing]] game from the 1980s, Herumor is given an extended history. [[J.R.R. Tolkien|Tolkien]], however, had nothing to do with writing this history. Fuinor is then his older brother.
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In the defunct [[Middle-earth Role Playing]] game from the 1980s, Herumor is given an extended history. Fuinur is then his older brother. [[J.R.R. Tolkien|Tolkien]], however, had nothing to do with writing this history.
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{{References}}
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{{title}}
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[[Category:Characters in The Silmarillion]]
 
[[Category:Númenóreans]]
 
[[Category:Númenóreans]]
 
[[Category:Black Númenóreans]]
 
[[Category:Black Númenóreans]]
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[[de:Herumor]]
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[[fr:encyclo/personnages/hommes/2a/numenoreens_noirs/herumor]]
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[[fi:Herumor]]

Latest revision as of 16:22, 29 December 2013

This article is about the Black Númenórean. For the character in The New Shadow, see Herumor (The New Shadow).
Herumor
Númenórean
Biographical Information
LocationNúmenor; Umbar
AffiliationBlack Númenóreans
BirthLate Second Age
Physical Description
GenderMale

Herumor was a Black Númenórean who lived in the late Second Age. After the Downfall of Númenor he, along with Fuinur, rose to power among the Haradrim and served Sauron.[1]

[edit] Etymology

Herumor means "Black Lord" in Quenya (from heru = "lord" and morë = "dark").

[edit] Portrayal in Adaptations

In the defunct Middle-earth Role Playing game from the 1980s, Herumor is given an extended history. Fuinur is then his older brother. Tolkien, however, had nothing to do with writing this history.

[edit] References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age"