Tolkien Gateway

Ivy Bush

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The '''Ivy Bush''' was an inn located on [[Bywater Road]] in the [[Shire]]. It was frequented by the [[Hobbits]] of [[Hobbiton]], and [[Bywater]]. It was here that [[Gaffer Gamgee]] got quite an audience who were interested in the stories he told about  [[Bilbo Baggins|Bilbo]], and [[Frodo Baggins]].
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The '''Ivy Bush''' was an inn located on [[Bywater Road]] in the [[Shire]].  
  
The Ivy Bush was also the name of a public house located on Hagley Road, [[Birmingham]], England. When [[J.R.R. Tolkien|Tolkien]] lived on Stirling Road this would have been his local hostelry and could be found halfway between his house and the Birmingham Oratory, where he worshiped for a time.{{Citation needed|date=July 2009}}
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==History==
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The Ivy Bush was frequented by the [[Hobbits]] of [[Hobbiton]] and [[Bywater]]. It was here that [[Gaffer Gamgee]] got quite an audience who were interested in the stories he told about  [[Bilbo Baggins|Bilbo]] and [[Frodo Baggins]].
  
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==Inspiration==
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The Ivy Bush was the name of a public house located on Hagley Road, [[Birmingham]], England. When [[J.R.R. Tolkien|Tolkien]] lived on Stirling Road this would have been his local hostelry and could be found halfway between his house and the Birmingham Oratory, where he worshiped for a time.{{fact}}
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{{references}}
 
[[Category:Inns]]
 
[[Category:Inns]]
 
[[Category:Shire]]
 
[[Category:Shire]]
 
[[de:Gasthaus „Zum Efeubusch“]]
 
[[de:Gasthaus „Zum Efeubusch“]]
 
[[fi:Muratti]]
 
[[fi:Muratti]]

Revision as of 19:04, 29 July 2009

The Ivy Bush was an inn located on Bywater Road in the Shire.

History

The Ivy Bush was frequented by the Hobbits of Hobbiton and Bywater. It was here that Gaffer Gamgee got quite an audience who were interested in the stories he told about Bilbo and Frodo Baggins.

Inspiration

The Ivy Bush was the name of a public house located on Hagley Road, Birmingham, England. When Tolkien lived on Stirling Road this would have been his local hostelry and could be found halfway between his house and the Birmingham Oratory, where he worshiped for a time.[source?]

References