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Lobelia Sackville-Baggins

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John Howe - Mistress Lobelia.jpg
Lobelia Sackville-Baggins
Hobbit
Biographical Information
Other namesLobelia Bracegirdle, Mistress Lobelia
LocationHardbottle, Hobbiton
BirthS.R. 1318
DeathS.R. 1420
Family
ParentageBlanco Bracegirdle + Primrose Boffin
Physical Description
GenderFemale

Lobelia Sackville-Baggins, née Bracegirdle (T.A. 2918 - 3020, died aged 102) was the second child, and only daughter, of Primrose Boffin and Blanco Bracegirdle.

Contents

History

Lobelia was a renowned character of the Shire, she married Bilbo's cousin Otho Sackville-Baggins, and they had one child together, Lotho, who was born in S.R. 1364.[1]

Her envy of Bag End was well-known,[2] she could not wait to inherit it, and was furious when Bilbo made Frodo his heir. However, when Frodo left for Rivendell he sold Bag End to Lobelia, but unfortunately Otho had died by then.[3]

During The War of the Ring, Lobelia was imprisoned in Lockholes for arguing with the Chief's Men, and attacking one of them with an umbrella. When she came out, Lobelia was popular for the first time for bravely standing up to the Saruman's Men. However, she was crushed to find out her son had died whilst she was in prison.

After the War of the Ring, Lobelia returned to her home village of Hardbottle to live with the other Bracegirdles, giving Bag End to Frodo. When she died, she gave her money to Frodo to be used to help hobbits left homeless by Saruman and her son.[4]

Genealogy

The Sackville-Baggins family tree.[1]

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mungo Baggins
1207-1300
 
Laura Grubb
1214-1316
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Belladonna Took
1252-1334
 
Bungo
1246-1326
 
Belba
1256-1356
 
Longo
1260-1350
 
Camellia Sackville
unknown
 
Linda
1262-1363
 
Bingo
1264-1363
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bilbo
1290-1421+
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Otho Sackville-Baggins
1310-1412
 
Lobelia Bracegirdle
1318-1420
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lotho
1364-1419
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Etymology

Sackville was the name of a relatively young Hobbit family.[5] Their name had an association with Baggins in that both contained an element for "bag/sack"; Sackville was a slightly more aristocratic version.[6] Tom Shippey argued that this "similarity" also provoked an antonymy: Bag End was used around England as a replacement of French cul-de-sac, "dead end street" - even Tolkien's own aunt Jane Neave lived in a house of that name. Tolkien did not like the Norman conquest of Britain, and made the Bagginses English. The name Sackville, however, is very Norman, as one of the few, if not the only, Hobbit family name.[7]

Other Versions of the Legendarium

In J.R.R. Tolkien's manuscript of The Hobbit the Sackville-Baggins were called the Allibone Baggins.[8] John D. Rateliff stated that the change to "Sackville" was penciled in about the time the story was being prepared for publication in 1936. The significance of "Allibone" is unknown although Mr. Rateliff thought it might relate to Alboin, a character in The Lost Road.[9]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix C, "Baggins of Hobbiton"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit, "The Return Journey"
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring, "A Long-expected Party"
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King, "The Grey Havens"
  5. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named L214
  6. J.R.R. Tolkien, Wayne G. Hammond, Christina Scull (eds.), Nomenclature of The Lord of the Rings, published in: Wayne G. Hammond, Christina Scull, The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion, page 762
  7. Tom Shippey, J.R.R. Tolkien: Author of the Century, page 10
  8. J.R.R. Tolkien, John D. Rateliff (ed.), The History of The Hobbit, Return to Bag-End, The Third Phase, "The End of the Journey", p. 691
  9. J.R.R. Tolkien, John D. Rateliff (ed.), The History of The Hobbit, Return to Bag-End, The Third Phase, "The End of the Journey", Text Note 14, p. 699
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References

  1. 1.0 1.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix C, "Baggins of Hobbiton"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit, "The Return Journey"
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring, "A Long-expected Party"
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King, "The Grey Havens"
  5. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named L214
  6. J.R.R. Tolkien, Wayne G. Hammond, Christina Scull (eds.), Nomenclature of The Lord of the Rings, published in: Wayne G. Hammond, Christina Scull, The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion, page 762
  7. Tom Shippey, J.R.R. Tolkien: Author of the Century, page 10
  8. J.R.R. Tolkien, John D. Rateliff (ed.), The History of The Hobbit, Return to Bag-End, The Third Phase, "The End of the Journey", p. 691
  9. J.R.R. Tolkien, John D. Rateliff (ed.), The History of The Hobbit, Return to Bag-End, The Third Phase, "The End of the Journey", Text Note 14, p. 699