Tolkien Gateway

Luinil

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One of the bright stars placed in the sky by [[Varda]] at the time of the awakening of the [[Elves]] in [[Middle-earth]]. Its identity is uncertain, though the fact that its name contains the [[Elvish]] word luin, meaning 'blue', does offer a clue.  
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'''Luinil''' was one of the bright stars placed in the sky by [[Varda]] at the time of the awakening of the [[Elves]] in [[Middle-earth]]. Its identity is uncertain, though the fact that its name contains the [[Elvish]] word ''[[luin]]'', meaning 'blue', does offer a clue.
  
The only remote explanation offered by [[J.R.R. Tolkien|Tolkien]] was a rough and uncertain note that seems to link Luinil to the planet we call Neptune. As [[Christopher Tolkien]] notes, though, this dark and distant object, too faint to be seen by the naked eye, would hardly qualify as a 'bright star'. Another alternative would be blue Rigel in Orion, making Luinil the mate of red [[Borgil]]. Two other possibilities - based purely on the fact that they are both bright blue stars - would be Spica in Virgo or Regulus in Leo.
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The only remote explanation offered by [[J.R.R. Tolkien|Tolkien]] was a rough and uncertain note that seems to link Luinil to the planet we call [en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neptune Neptune]. As [[Christopher Tolkien]] notes, though, this dark and distant object, too faint to be seen by the naked eye, would hardly qualify as a 'bright star'. Another alternative would be blue [en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rigel Rigel] in [en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orion Orion], making Luinil the mate of red [[Borgil]]. Two other possibilities - based purely on the fact that they are both bright blue stars - would be [en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spica Spica] in [en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virgo Virgo] or [en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regulus Regulus] in [en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leo Leo].
  
 
[[category:Stars]]
 
[[category:Stars]]

Revision as of 22:19, 28 January 2007

Luinil was one of the bright stars placed in the sky by Varda at the time of the awakening of the Elves in Middle-earth. Its identity is uncertain, though the fact that its name contains the Elvish word luin, meaning 'blue', does offer a clue.

The only remote explanation offered by Tolkien was a rough and uncertain note that seems to link Luinil to the planet we call [en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neptune Neptune]. As Christopher Tolkien notes, though, this dark and distant object, too faint to be seen by the naked eye, would hardly qualify as a 'bright star'. Another alternative would be blue [en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rigel Rigel] in [en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orion Orion], making Luinil the mate of red Borgil. Two other possibilities - based purely on the fact that they are both bright blue stars - would be [en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spica Spica] in [en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virgo Virgo] or [en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regulus Regulus] in [en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leo Leo].