Tolkien Gateway

Meduseld

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[[Image:Brothers Hildebrandt - The Golden Hall of Rohan.jpg|thumb|300px|''The Golden Hall of Rohan'' by [[Brothers Hildebrandt]]]]
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[[Image:Brothers Hildebrandt - The Golden Hall of Rohan.jpg|thumb|250px|''The Golden Hall of Rohan'' by [[Brothers Hildebrandt]]]]
 
'''Meduseld''' was the great '''Golden Hall''' built in [[Edoras]].
 
'''Meduseld''' was the great '''Golden Hall''' built in [[Edoras]].
  
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In many ways Meduseld is inspired by Anglo-Saxon poetry, particularly [[Beowulf]], which contains the mead-hall Heorot. The description of "the light of it shines far across the land" is one of the lines from this poem.
 
In many ways Meduseld is inspired by Anglo-Saxon poetry, particularly [[Beowulf]], which contains the mead-hall Heorot. The description of "the light of it shines far across the land" is one of the lines from this poem.
  
[[Category: Halls]]
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[[fr:encyclo/geographie/villes_tours_et_forteresses/rohan/meduseld]]
 
[[fr:encyclo/geographie/villes_tours_et_forteresses/rohan/meduseld]]

Revision as of 19:00, 13 February 2011

Meduseld was the great Golden Hall built in Edoras.

After the Éothéod had settled in Rohan, the Second King of Rohan, Brego son of Eorl, began building a great hall on top of the hill of Edoras.

Meduseld was a large hall with a straw roof, which made it appear as if it was made out of gold when seen from far off. Its walls were richly decorated with tapestries depicting the history and legends of the Rohirrim, and it served as a house for the King and his kin, a meeting hall for the King and his advisors, and a feast hall.

In the late Third Age, Meduseld was the home of King Théoden.

Etymology

The word Meduseld, in the Old English, means "Mead Hall" having a connotation of "Hall of feasts"; medu means "mead" but as a word it has connotations to "joy".

Inspiration

In many ways Meduseld is inspired by Anglo-Saxon poetry, particularly Beowulf, which contains the mead-hall Heorot. The description of "the light of it shines far across the land" is one of the lines from this poem.