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Narchost

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==Etymology==
 
==Etymology==
 
   
 
   
In his unfinished index for the Lord of the Rings, Tolkien translated ''Narchost'' as "Bitter-biting Fort".<ref>{{HM|RC}}, p. 601</ref>
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In his unfinished index for the Lord of the Rings, Tolkien translated the [[Sindarin]] name ''Narchost'' as "Bitter-biting Fort".<ref>{{HM|RC}}, p. 601</ref> Its initial element ''narch'' "bitter-biting" is not otherwise attested, but a similar ([[Noldorin]]) verb ''[[narcha-]]'' "to rend" appears in the Etymologies as a derivative of the root ''[[NÁRAK]]''.<ref>{{LR|Etymologies}}, '''NÁRAK'''</ref> The second element is ''[[ost]]'' "fortress".<ref>{{S|Appendix}}, ''os(t)''</ref>
  
 
{{references}}
 
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Revision as of 03:31, 2 February 2014

Narchost was one of the two towers known as the Teeth of Mordor,[1] that stood on two hills either side of the Black Gate of the Morannon, guarding the northwestern entrance into Mordor. Narchost and its companion Carchost were originally built by the Gondorians, as a guard upon Mordor after Sauron's first defeat. As Gondor's strength waned, Narchost was abandoned and left to decay, until Sauron returned to his ancient land. His forces took over both the old guard-towers and repaired them, so that at the time of the War of the Ring, they formed part of Sauron's own defences.[2]

Etymology

In his unfinished index for the Lord of the Rings, Tolkien translated the Sindarin name Narchost as "Bitter-biting Fort".[3] Its initial element narch "bitter-biting" is not otherwise attested, but a similar (Noldorin) verb narcha- "to rend" appears in the Etymologies as a derivative of the root NÁRAK.[4] The second element is ost "fortress".[5]

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Two Towers, "The Black Gate is Closed"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King, "The Tower of Cirith Ungol"
  3. Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull (eds), The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion, p. 601
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Lost Road and Other Writings, "Part Three: The Etymologies", NÁRAK
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Appendix: Elements in Quenya and Sindarin Names", os(t)