Tolkien Gateway

Nardol

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The Beacon on [[Eilenach]] was the second out from [[Minas Tirith]], but the summit of that mountain came to a sharp point, making the building of a bright beacon difficult. The next Beacon site to the west was not so hampered - it stood on the broad end of a ridge of the [[White Mountains]], and the guard station maintained there could create a huge signal fire when needed. It was for this reason that the third Beacon acquired the name '''Nardol''', 'fire-hilltop' ([[Sindarin|S.]] ''[[naur]]'' "fire" + ''[[dôl]]'' "hill"), because its beacon-fire was so bright it could be seen more than a hundred miles away.
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'''Nardol''' was the third [[Beacon]] of [[Gondor]]. It stood on the broad end of a ridge of the [[White Mountains]], and the guard station maintained there could create a huge signal fire when needed. It was well-stored with fuel and at need a great blaze could be lit.
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Its fire could be visible on a clear night even as far as the [[Halifirien]] (some 120 miles to the west)
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The guard also protected the quarries.
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The previous Beacon on [[Eilenach]] came to a sharp point, making the building of a bright beacon difficult.
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==Etymology==
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The name means 'fire-hilltop' ([[Sindarin|S.]] ''[[naur]]'' "fire" + ''[[dôl]]'' "hill"), because its beacon-fire was so bright.
  
 
[[Category:Beacons of Gondor]]
 
[[Category:Beacons of Gondor]]

Revision as of 09:29, 16 January 2009

Nardol was the third Beacon of Gondor. It stood on the broad end of a ridge of the White Mountains, and the guard station maintained there could create a huge signal fire when needed. It was well-stored with fuel and at need a great blaze could be lit.

Its fire could be visible on a clear night even as far as the Halifirien (some 120 miles to the west)

The guard also protected the quarries.

The previous Beacon on Eilenach came to a sharp point, making the building of a bright beacon difficult.

Etymology

The name means 'fire-hilltop' (S. naur "fire" + dôl "hill"), because its beacon-fire was so bright.