Tolkien Gateway

Ogres

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'''Ogres''' were monstrous and destructive creatures of legend and folklore. In fact, it is doubtful whether Ogres ever existed in [[Middle-earth]]. [[Tolkien]] mentions them only once, in [[The Hobbit]], during [[Bilbo's Riddle-game]] with [[Gollum]]. In his attempt to solve Gollum's fifth riddle, Bilbo '...sat in the dark thinking of all the horrible names of all the giants and ogres he had ever heard told of in tales...' Since no ogre is ever again mentioned in the works on Middle-earth that Tolkien published during his lifetime, it is entirely possible that they were a mythical race even to the inhabitants of Middle-earth.  It is also possible that Ogre is just another name for the [[Trolls]], as is true in many mythologies.
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'''Ogres''' were monstrous and destructive creatures of legend and folklore. In fact, it is doubtful whether Ogres ever existed in [[Middle-earth]].  
  
== Early mythology ==
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During the [[Riddle-game]] with [[Gollum]], [[Bilbo Baggins]] in his attempt to solve Gollum's fifth riddle, he sat thinking of all the horrible names of all the giants and ogres he had ever heard told of in tales.
  
''Ogres'' were used by J.R.R. Tolkien in early drafts of Middle-earth as a name for one of the monsters bred by [[Melkor]]. In posthumous publications, ogres appear in:
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No ogre is ever mentioned in the annals of the [[Elder Days]] and none played any role in the wars and battles. It is entirely possible that they were a mythical race.  
  
*''The Creatures of the Earth'', J.R.R. Tolkien (published in [[Parma Eldalamberon]], issue 14): "Hongwir (Ogres of the north) and Sarqindi (Ogres of the south): cannibal giants of lesser size."
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It is also possible that Ogre is just another name for the [[Trolls]].
  
*''[[The Book of Lost Tales Part 1]]'': "Úvanimor [bred by Melkor] who are monsters, giants, and ogres"
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== Other versions of the legendarium ==
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''Ogres'' were used by J.R.R. Tolkien in early drafts of Middle-earth as a name for one of the monsters bred by [[Melkor]] along with [[Gongs]] and the other [[Úvanimor]].<ref>{{HM|LT1}}</ref>
  
Another mention (of much later date) of ogres by Tolkien is in his analysis of the name Ettendales in ''[[Guide to the Names in The Lord of the Rings]]'': "This is meant to be a Common Speech (not Elvish) name, though it contains an obsolete element eten 'troll, ogre'."
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They are mentioned as cannibal [[giant]]s. Those of the north were known as [[Hongwir]] while the southern ones were named [[Sarqindi]].<ref>''The Creatures of the Earth'', J.R.R. Tolkien (published in [[Parma Eldalamberon 14]]</ref>
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*': "[bred by Melkor] who are monsters, giants, and ogres"
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Tolkien mentioned once more ogres out of context in his analysis of the name [[Ettendales]] in ''[[Guide to the Names in The Lord of the Rings]]'': "This is meant to be a Common Speech (not Elvish) name, though it contains an obsolete element eten 'troll, ogre'."
  
 
[[Category:Creatures]]
 
[[Category:Creatures]]

Revision as of 12:07, 10 December 2009

Ogres were monstrous and destructive creatures of legend and folklore. In fact, it is doubtful whether Ogres ever existed in Middle-earth.

During the Riddle-game with Gollum, Bilbo Baggins in his attempt to solve Gollum's fifth riddle, he sat thinking of all the horrible names of all the giants and ogres he had ever heard told of in tales.

No ogre is ever mentioned in the annals of the Elder Days and none played any role in the wars and battles. It is entirely possible that they were a mythical race.

It is also possible that Ogre is just another name for the Trolls.

Other versions of the legendarium

Ogres were used by J.R.R. Tolkien in early drafts of Middle-earth as a name for one of the monsters bred by Melkor along with Gongs and the other Úvanimor.[1]

They are mentioned as cannibal giants. Those of the north were known as Hongwir while the southern ones were named Sarqindi.[2]

  • ': "[bred by Melkor] who are monsters, giants, and ogres"

Tolkien mentioned once more ogres out of context in his analysis of the name Ettendales in Guide to the Names in The Lord of the Rings: "This is meant to be a Common Speech (not Elvish) name, though it contains an obsolete element eten 'troll, ogre'."


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