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Pete Fenlon

(Difference between revisions)
(The Fenlon Style)
(Bibliography)
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==Bibliography==
 
==Bibliography==
* [[1982]]: ''[[MERP: An Artist's Interpretations of Middle Earth]]''
+
* [[1982]]: ''[[MERP: An Artist's Interpretation of Middle Earth]]''
 
* [[1984]]: ''[[MERP: Moria, The Dwarven City]]''
 
* [[1984]]: ''[[MERP: Moria, The Dwarven City]]''
 
* [[1984]]: ''[[MERP: Dagorlad and the Dead Marshes]]''
 
* [[1984]]: ''[[MERP: Dagorlad and the Dead Marshes]]''

Revision as of 00:08, 28 March 2010

File:Fenlon.jpg
Pete Fenlon
Biographical information
Born1955
EducationHistory, Anthropology, Law
LocationCharlottesville, VA

Peter C. Fenlon, Jr. (1955-) is an American role-playing game designer/author and illustrator. He was the former president and one of the founders of Iron Crown Enterprises, and contributed extensively to the Middle-earth Role Playing game.

Contents

The Fenlon Style

As an illustrator, Fenlon is especially known for his maps of Middle-earth. These were a large-scale map of the continent of Middle-earth (first released in 1982 as An Artist's Interpretation of Middle Earth) and several smaller-scale maps of different regions of Middle-earth (most of whom were printed in Northwestern Middle-earth Map Set). The smaller-scale maps were often included as separate color fold-outs with the MERP 1st Ed. modules. With MERP 2nd Ed., no new maps were released.

Fenlon's maps have continued to have an explicit influence on later Middle-earth cartographers (e.g., Thomas Morwinsky and Sampsa Rydman), and his continental map has been discussed and revised in the magazines Other Hands and Other Minds.[1]

The characteristical maps of Fenlon have even created an expression known as 'Fenlon Style maps'. In January 2008, the Cartographer's Annual (Vol. 2) released a Pete Fenlon style pack for use with ProFantasy Software cartography tools.[2]

Bibliography

See also

External links

References

  1. Other Hands July 2000. Other Minds, issue 1 and issue 2.
  2. The Cartographer's Annual Vol. 2 (external link)