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Quest of the Ring

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The Quest of the Ring, also known as the Quest for Mount Doom, was the quest taken by the members of the Fellowship of the Ring to destroy the One Ring of Sauron to rid the evil in Middle-earth during the Third Age. It forms the center of the story of The Lord of the Rings.

History

Though its necessity was obvious to many beforehand, the Quest was initiated during the Council of Elrond. Elrond appointed eight members to accompany the ring-bearer Frodo Baggins on his difficult journey: Gandalf, Aragorn, Legolas, Gimli, Boromir, Sam, Merry and Pippin. Merry and Pippin were not chosen, but went on their own consent. After spending the winter in Rivendell, the Company set off on the arduous journey that lay ahead.

They set off for Eregion, and attempted to cross the Misty Mountains at the Redhorn Pass. Stopped by snow, the Fellowship sought a different path: the long dark of Moria. There, Gandalf fell in battle with Durin's Bane.

The remaining eight members of the Fellowship, now led by Aragorn, entered Lothlórien, where they spent a month in the care of Celeborn and Galadriel. They departed by swift Elven boats, and headed South over the Anduin.

And so they came to Nen Hithoel and the Emyn Muil, where Boromir was slain, and the Fellowship was broken. Frodo and Sam crossed the river to the east and, after much toil, escaped the hills. With the help of Gollum, they crossed the Dead Marshes, and came in sight of the Black Gate. Unable to enter Mordor, they went to the pass of Cirith Ungol, but were divided by the treachery of Gollum. Frodo was stung by Shelob and taken prisoner. At the Tower of Cirith Ungol, he was stripped of his affects, but the Sam managed to free him. The Ring had, at this stage, been taken by Sam, for safe-keeping.

Frodo and Sam continued their way, via the Isenmouthe, to Mount Doom. Gollum appeared one last time to seize the Ring, but fell with it to his death into the fiery chasm of Mount Doom.

References