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Sacking of Mount Gundabad

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Sacking of Mount Gundabad
Conflict: War of the Dwarves and Orcs.
Date: 2793-2798 of the Third Age. Most the first few years.
Place: Mount Gundabad
Outcome: The Coalition of Dwarves wipe out all the Orcs they can find in the mountain and plunder it of any treasure or valuables.
Combatants

Dwarves

Orcs

Commanders

Thráin II

Unknown Orc Chieftain(s)

Strength

Unknown, but likely 15,000 or so Dwarves of all Seven houses.

Unknown. As the capitol, likely thousands.

Casualties

Unknown

Obliterated. All that were found.

The Sacking of Mount Gundabad was a battle that took place sometime between T.A. 2793 and T.A. 2799 during the War of the Dwarves and Orcs.

Contents

Background

The murder of Thrór, the former king of the Longbeards, by the Orc chieftain Azog in T.A. 2790 sent a shockwave throughout the Dwarven race unlike any before. At his son Thráin II's behest, all Seven Houses were rallied, and in three years the host was gathered and set out to avenge the elder father of their race.

Date

It is insinuated that when the coalition set out for war the first place targeted was Mount Gundabad. For the war lasted six years, and the Dwarves campaign seems to have been one that started in the far north (Gundabad) and place by place, they made their way south (the Gladden). It can therefore be assumed that Gundabad was set upon in the outset (may be one to two years).

The Battle

The Mountain was assailed and sacked by the great host of King Thráin sometime in 2793 and was abandoned when it was totally eradicated of Orcs sometime later.[1]

Aftermath

The Dwarves annihilated the Orcs they could find at Gundabad, but with their host continuing on the crusade of vengeance down the Misty Mountains the land was left empty and (at some point) during or after the War's end in 2799 the Orcs of the Misty Mountains returned to their self-proclaimed capitol, and reestablished it as a stronghold and hub.

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix A, "Durin's Folk"