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Salmar

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In earlier conceptions of the legendarium (see: ''[[The History of Middle-earth]]'') Salmar is often called by the title '''Noldorin''', and sometimes '''Lirillo''', and was envisioned as a [[Valar|Vala]] in the service of [[Aulë]].
 
In earlier conceptions of the legendarium (see: ''[[The History of Middle-earth]]'') Salmar is often called by the title '''Noldorin''', and sometimes '''Lirillo''', and was envisioned as a [[Valar|Vala]] in the service of [[Aulë]].
  
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==Etymology==
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The [[Quenya|Q(u)enya]] name ''Salmar'' is derived from ''salma'' ("lyre, small harp"). ''Lirillo'' is a [[Qenya]] name meaning "Valu of the Song" (containing either ''glîr'' "a song, poem" or ''lir-'' "sing" + masculine ending ''-illo'').<ref>{{PE|14}}, p. 13 (footnote 10)</ref>
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Revision as of 13:53, 1 April 2013

Salmar
Maia
Kent Burles - Salmar.png
Biographical Information
Other namesnone
DeathImmortal
Physical Description
GenderMale
GalleryImages of Salmar

Salmar (Q, pron. [ˈsalmar]) made the Ulumúri for his lord Ulmo, the great conches which produce the music of the sea.[1]

In the index of The Silmarillion Salmar is described as a Maia,[2] but it is unknown whether that entry was written by J.R.R. Tolkien or his son Christopher Tolkien. While there is no other text describing Salmar as one of the Maiar his status as a spirit who accompanied Ulmo but was not listed amongst the Valar would make that the logical conclusion.

Other Versions of the legendarium

In earlier conceptions of the legendarium (see: The History of Middle-earth) Salmar is often called by the title Noldorin, and sometimes Lirillo, and was envisioned as a Vala in the service of Aulë.

Etymology

The Q(u)enya name Salmar is derived from salma ("lyre, small harp"). Lirillo is a Qenya name meaning "Valu of the Song" (containing either glîr "a song, poem" or lir- "sing" + masculine ending -illo).[3]

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Beginning of Days"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Index of Names"
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Early Qenya and The Valmaric Script", in Parma Eldalamberon XIV (edited by Carl F. Hostetter, Christopher Gilson, Arden R. Smith, Patrick H. Wynne, and Bill Welden), p. 13 (footnote 10)