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Shirriffs

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though that was not enough to prevent [[Frodo Baggins|Frodo]], [[Samwise Gamgee|Sam]], [[Meriadoc Brandybuck|Merry]], [[Peregrin Took|Pippin]], and others from liberating the [[Shire-folk]].
 
though that was not enough to prevent [[Frodo Baggins|Frodo]], [[Samwise Gamgee|Sam]], [[Meriadoc Brandybuck|Merry]], [[Peregrin Took|Pippin]], and others from liberating the [[Shire-folk]].
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==Etymology==
 
==Etymology==
 
Shirriff is an archaic rendition of "sheriff". Both mean "shire-reeve" ([[Old English]] ''scīrgerefa'')
 
Shirriff is an archaic rendition of "sheriff". Both mean "shire-reeve" ([[Old English]] ''scīrgerefa'')
[[Category:Organizations]]
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[[category:Shire]]
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[[Category:Organisations in the Shire]]

Revision as of 22:24, 1 September 2010

Shirrifs were the sole law enforcement officials in the Shire and the main branch of the Watch.

Since in the Shire law is based solely on common sense and ancient tradition, it was not broken. It was the Shirriffs' job to protect the Shire from trespassers more than anything. There were a total of twelve in all of the Shire, three in each Farthing, and were distinguished from "civilians" by a feather worn in their caps.

The Mayor of Michel Delving was considered the First Shirriff.

The only time this number was any larger was from two circumstances. The first, less serious, was the "Special Constabulary" power, where hobbits were deputized into patrolling the borders, which were called Bounders.

The second was when Saruman had infiltrated the Shire, and had taken control, with the help of footpads and shady characters like Bill Ferny. Saruman had increased the number to supress any revolting, and arrest anybody who broke the rules. They were assigned in companies such as the First Eastfarthing Troop.

though that was not enough to prevent Frodo, Sam, Merry, Pippin, and others from liberating the Shire-folk.

Etymology

Shirriff is an archaic rendition of "sheriff". Both mean "shire-reeve" (Old English scīrgerefa)