Tolkien Gateway

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (edition)

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'''Sir Gawain and the Green Knight''' is a 14th century manuscript which was translated by [[J.R.R. Tolkien]] and [[E.V. Gordon]] in 1925.
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{{book
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|title=Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
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|image=
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|author=[[J.R.R. Tolkien]] and [[E.V. Gordon]] (with Norman Davis 2nd ed.)
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|publisher=Clarendon Press
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|date=[[1925]], ([[1967]] 2nd ed.)
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|format=
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|pages=211 (232 2nd ed.)
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|isbn=
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|amazon=
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|amazonprice=
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}}
  
[[Category:Books]]
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'''Sir Gawain and the Green Knight''' is a 14th century manuscript. In [[1925]], [[J.R.R. Tolkien]] and [[E.V. Gordon]] published a scholarly edition of it. It was not a translation, though Tolien did make one: it was published later along with his translations of ''[[Pearl]]'' and ''[[Sir Orfeo]]''. The two are often mistaken; Amazon for example uses the [http://www.amazon.com/Sir-Gawain-Green-Knight-Tolkien/dp/0261102591/ref=pd_bbs_sr_6?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1207318505&sr=8-6 translation] on the main page, but the edition in the [http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0261102591/ref=sib_fs_top/105-6833776-9586009?ie=UTF8&p=S00T&checkSum=AfBasp9T%2BB61Ag1mv7Q7WmZ7EotBcI39pdoiNWDXpRc%3D# Online reader].
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The story of Gawain and the Christian themes was also the subject of Tolkien's [[W.P. Ker Lecture]] of [[1953]].
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This edition is now out-of-print, but should be available at university libraries.
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==Back Cover (2nd edition)==
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The study of ''Sir Gawain'', the finest of all the English medieval romances, was signally advanced by the publication in 1925 of the edition by the late Professors Tolkien and Gordon. This remained the most widely used text of the poem; but after forty years the time came for revision. The new edition pursues the aim of the first – to present an accurate text pleasantly, with sufficient apparatus to enable a reader to understand the rich but difficult language, and so to reach for himself an informed appreciation of the poem. The Text, and the iniquely full glossary, were revised to take account of recent views. The Introduction, Notes, and Linguistic Appendix were largely rewritten; and the book was entirely reset.
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==External links==
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* [http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/AnoGawa.html Edition online]
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* [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Gawain_and_the_Green_Knight Entry at Wikipedia]
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[[Category:Books by J.R.R. Tolkien]]

Revision as of 14:32, 4 April 2008

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
AuthorJ.R.R. Tolkien and E.V. Gordon (with Norman Davis 2nd ed.)
PublisherClarendon Press
Released1925, (1967 2nd ed.)
Pages211 (232 2nd ed.)

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is a 14th century manuscript. In 1925, J.R.R. Tolkien and E.V. Gordon published a scholarly edition of it. It was not a translation, though Tolien did make one: it was published later along with his translations of Pearl and Sir Orfeo. The two are often mistaken; Amazon for example uses the translation on the main page, but the edition in the Online reader.

The story of Gawain and the Christian themes was also the subject of Tolkien's W.P. Ker Lecture of 1953.

This edition is now out-of-print, but should be available at university libraries.

Back Cover (2nd edition)

The study of Sir Gawain, the finest of all the English medieval romances, was signally advanced by the publication in 1925 of the edition by the late Professors Tolkien and Gordon. This remained the most widely used text of the poem; but after forty years the time came for revision. The new edition pursues the aim of the first – to present an accurate text pleasantly, with sufficient apparatus to enable a reader to understand the rich but difficult language, and so to reach for himself an informed appreciation of the poem. The Text, and the iniquely full glossary, were revised to take account of recent views. The Introduction, Notes, and Linguistic Appendix were largely rewritten; and the book was entirely reset.

External links