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Sleep of Yavanna

Sleep of Yavanna
Event
Other namesPeace of Arda
LocationArda
DateYears of the Trees
Part ofYears of the Trees
Participantsanimals and plants
DescriptionAn event in which the creations of Yavanna fell silent for ages

The Sleep of Yavanna is a period of the very ancient times of Arda.

The two great Lamps of the Valar which were giving light to the World during the Spring of Arda were destroyed by Melkor along with the Valar's dwellings on Almaren, driving them away into the West.[1] Thus the Great Lands were left in darkness, and Yavanna protected the creatures living there by setting them to sleep and they did not grow or age until light should come again.[2]

While the Valar were preparing the bliss of Valinor bathed in the light of the Two Trees, Middle-earth was in darkness and silence, fell beasts of hideous form multiplied in Utumno. It was Ulmo who did not forsake the Outer Lands and kept the earth alive. Yavanna also came healing the hurts of Melkor, and Orome hunted monsters, and kept the shadows at bay while blowing the Valaróma, albeit temporarily.[1]

It was during the Sleep of Yavanna when Aule in his impatience created the Seven Fathers of the Dwarves under the mountains of Middle-earth. As Middle-earth was dark and dangerous, Aule made his children robust and sturdy.[3]

Varda created new stars and the Elves awoke. Only Dwarves and Elves roamed the Middle-earth which was lit only by the stars, and most creatures were sleeping.[2] Most life could be found in Doriath under the guidance of Melian; and in the North, where Orcs and other creatures of the Enemy multiplied.[4]

After the Darkening of Valinor and the death of the Two Trees, it was the rising of the Sun that finally returned light to Middle-earth and a Second Spring of Arda.

[edit] References

  1. 1.0 1.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Beginning of Days"
  2. 2.0 2.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Coming of the Elves and the Captivity of Melkor"
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of Aulë and Yavanna"
  4. Robert Foster, The Complete Guide to Middle-earth, entry "Sleep of Yavanna".