Tolkien Gateway

Stanley Unwin

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Sir '''Stanley Unwin''' (1884-[[1968]]) was a British publisher, founder of the [[Allen and Unwin|George Allen and Unwin]] house in [[1914]]. This published serious and sometimes controversial authors like Bertrand Russell and [[Mahatma Gandhi]].
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Sir '''Stanley Unwin''' (1884-[[1968]]) was a British publisher, founder of the [[Allen and Unwin|George Allen and Unwin]] house in [[1914]]. This published serious and sometimes controversial authors like Bertrand Russell and Mahatma Gandhi.
  
 
In [[1936]] [[J.R.R. Tolkien]] submitted ''[[The Hobbit]]'' for publication, and Unwin paid his ten-year-old son [[Rayner Unwin|Rayner]] a few pence to write a report on the manuscript. Rayner's favourable response prompted Unwin to publish the book. Once the book became a success Unwin asked Tolkien for a sequel, which eventually became ''[[The Lord of the Rings]]''.
 
In [[1936]] [[J.R.R. Tolkien]] submitted ''[[The Hobbit]]'' for publication, and Unwin paid his ten-year-old son [[Rayner Unwin|Rayner]] a few pence to write a report on the manuscript. Rayner's favourable response prompted Unwin to publish the book. Once the book became a success Unwin asked Tolkien for a sequel, which eventually became ''[[The Lord of the Rings]]''.
  
[[Category:People|Unwin, Stanley]]
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[[Category:Publishers (people)|Unwin, Stanley]]
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[[Category:Letter receivers|Unwin, Stanley]]
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[[Category:British people|Unwin, Stanley]]
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[[Category:People by name|Unwin, Stanley]]

Revision as of 16:03, 20 July 2010

Sir Stanley Unwin (1884-1968) was a British publisher, founder of the George Allen and Unwin house in 1914. This published serious and sometimes controversial authors like Bertrand Russell and Mahatma Gandhi.

In 1936 J.R.R. Tolkien submitted The Hobbit for publication, and Unwin paid his ten-year-old son Rayner a few pence to write a report on the manuscript. Rayner's favourable response prompted Unwin to publish the book. Once the book became a success Unwin asked Tolkien for a sequel, which eventually became The Lord of the Rings.