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Sunlending

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'''Sunlending''' was the name used by the [[Rohirrim]] of the land of ''[[Anórien]]'', 'Sun-land'. It is mentioned in the song ''From dark Dunharrow in the dim morning'', l. 15: "''six thousand spears to Sunlending''".<ref>{{RK|V3}}</ref>
 
'''Sunlending''' was the name used by the [[Rohirrim]] of the land of ''[[Anórien]]'', 'Sun-land'. It is mentioned in the song ''From dark Dunharrow in the dim morning'', l. 15: "''six thousand spears to Sunlending''".<ref>{{RK|V3}}</ref>
  
The name ''Sunlending'' did not refer to the climate, but was rather 'heraldic', as Anórien was immediately attached to [[Minas Anor]]. ''Sunledning'' was thus connected to the name and the emblem of [[Anárion]], son of [[Isildur]].<ref>{{HM|N}}, p. 776</ref>
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The name ''Sunlending'' did not refer to the climate, but was rather 'heraldic', as Anórien was immediately attached to [[Minas Anor]]. ''Sunlending'' was thus connected to the name and the emblem of [[Anárion]], brother of [[Isildur]].<ref>{{HM|N}}, p. 776</ref>
 
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Latest revision as of 07:13, 14 January 2013

Not to be confounded with: Sunlands, the name of Harad in the Common Speech

Sunlending was the name used by the Rohirrim of the land of Anórien, 'Sun-land'. It is mentioned in the song From dark Dunharrow in the dim morning, l. 15: "six thousand spears to Sunlending".[1]

The name Sunlending did not refer to the climate, but was rather 'heraldic', as Anórien was immediately attached to Minas Anor. Sunlending was thus connected to the name and the emblem of Anárion, brother of Isildur.[2]

[edit] References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King, "The Muster of Rohan"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Nomenclature of The Lord of the Rings" in Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull (eds), The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion, p. 776