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Taur

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'''Taur''' is a [[Sindarin]] word, coming from a root meaning "powerful".
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==Sindarin==
  
It can, in this sense, mean:
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'''''taur''''' is a [[Sindarin]] word meaning "forest".<ref name=PE17>{{PE|17}}. pp. 82, 115</ref><ref>{{S|Appendix}}</ref>
* ''large forest''  
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* ''king (of a tribe, not a land)''
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* ''mighty, vast, sublime''
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===Etymology===
  
[[Category:Sindarin words]]
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Sindarin ''taur'' is a descendant form of ?[[Primitive Quendian]] ''tau-rē'', derived from [[Sundocarme|root]] [[TAW]].<ref name=PE17/>
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===Cognates===
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*[[Quenya]] ''[[taure]]''<ref name=PE17/>
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==Noldorin==
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===Etymology 1===
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'''''taur''''' is a [[Noldorin]] word meaning "great wood, forest",<ref group=note>Note that it was used only of "huge forests", affected by the meaning of its homophones.</ref> a descendant form of [[Primitive Quendian]] ''[[taurē]]'', derived from [[Sundocarme|root]] [[TAW#Other versions of the legendarium|TÁWAR]].<ref name=LR1>{{LR|Etymologies}}, p. 391</ref>
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===Etymology 2===
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'''''taur''''' is a poetic/archaic (†) [[Noldorin]] word meaning "king", derived from Primitive Quendian ''[[tāro]]'' ("king: only used of the legitimate kings of the whole tribes"), from root [[TĀ|TĀ, TAƷ]].<ref name=LR2>{{LR|Etymologies}}, p. 389</ref>
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===Etymology 3===
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'''''taur''''' is a [[Noldorin]] adjective meaning "vast, mighty, overwhelming, awful - also high, sublime" (poetic only or in ancient titles and names), from roots [[TĀ|TĀ, TAƷ]]/[[TUR]].<ref name=LR1/><ref name=LR3>{{LR|Etymologies}}, p. 395</ref>
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==Ilkorin==
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The [[Ilkorin]] word '''''taur''''' means "great wood, forest" or "wood (place and material), a descendant form of [[Primitive Quendian]] ''taurē'', derived from [[Sundocarme|root]] [[TAW#Other versions of the legendarium|TÁWAR]].<ref name=LR1/>
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==See also==
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*[[daur#Daur in the Song of Praise|''Daur'' in the Song of Praise]]
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{{references|note}}
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{{title|lowercase}}
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[[Category:Ilkorin nouns]]
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[[Category:Noldorin adjectives]]
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[[Category:Noldorin nouns]]
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[[Category:Sindarin adjectives]]
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[[Category:Sindarin nouns]]

Latest revision as of 20:46, 19 October 2012

Contents

[edit] Sindarin

taur is a Sindarin word meaning "forest".[1][2]

[edit] Etymology

Sindarin taur is a descendant form of ?Primitive Quendian tau-rē, derived from root TAW.[1]

[edit] Cognates

[edit] Noldorin

[edit] Etymology 1

taur is a Noldorin word meaning "great wood, forest",[note 1] a descendant form of Primitive Quendian taurē, derived from root TÁWAR.[3]

[edit] Etymology 2

taur is a poetic/archaic (†) Noldorin word meaning "king", derived from Primitive Quendian tāro ("king: only used of the legitimate kings of the whole tribes"), from root TĀ, TAƷ.[4]

[edit] Etymology 3

taur is a Noldorin adjective meaning "vast, mighty, overwhelming, awful - also high, sublime" (poetic only or in ancient titles and names), from roots TĀ, TAƷ/TUR.[3][5]

[edit] Ilkorin

The Ilkorin word taur means "great wood, forest" or "wood (place and material), a descendant form of Primitive Quendian taurē, derived from root TÁWAR.[3]

[edit] See also

Notes

  1. Note that it was used only of "huge forests", affected by the meaning of its homophones.

[edit] References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 J.R.R. Tolkien, "Words, Phrases and Passages in Various Tongues in The Lord of the Rings", in Parma Eldalamberon XVII (edited by Christopher Gilson). pp. 82, 115
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Appendix: Elements in Quenya and Sindarin Names"
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Lost Road and Other Writings, "Part Three: The Etymologies", p. 391
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Lost Road and Other Writings, "Part Three: The Etymologies", p. 389
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Lost Road and Other Writings, "Part Three: The Etymologies", p. 395