Tolkien Gateway

The Adventures of Tom Bombadil

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''Tom Bombadil'' can best be seen as a small, poetic venture into Tolkien's imagination.
 
''Tom Bombadil'' can best be seen as a small, poetic venture into Tolkien's imagination.
 
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==Poems
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#[[The Adventures of Tom Bombadil]]
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#[[Bombadil Goes Boating]]
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#[[Errantry]]
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#[[Little Princess Mee]]
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#[[The Man in the Moon stayed up too Late]]
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#[[The Man in the Moon came down too soon]]
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#[[The Stone Troll]]
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#[[Perry-the-Winkle]]
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#[[The Mewlips]]
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#[[Oliphaunt]]
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#
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#[[The Cat]]
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#[[Shadow-Bride]]
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#[[The Hoard]]
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#[[The Sea-Bell]]
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#[[The Last Ship]]
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[[cate
 
[[Category:Books|Adventures of Tom Bombadil]]
 
[[Category:Books|Adventures of Tom Bombadil]]
 
[[Category:Books by J.R.R. Tolkien|Adventures of Tom Bombadil]]
 
[[Category:Books by J.R.R. Tolkien|Adventures of Tom Bombadil]]
 
[[de:Die Abenteuer des Tom Bombadil]]
 
[[de:Die Abenteuer des Tom Bombadil]]
 
[[fi:The Adventures of Tom Bombadil and other verses from the Red Book]]
 
[[fi:The Adventures of Tom Bombadil and other verses from the Red Book]]

Revision as of 21:43, 3 August 2008

The Adventures of Tom Bombadil
The Adventures of Tom Bombadil cover.jpg
AuthorJ.R.R. Tolkien
PublisherAllen and Unwin
Released1962
FormatUnknown
Pages63
ISBNUnknown

The Adventures of Tom Bombadil is a collection of poetry by J.R.R. Tolkien, published in 1962. The book contains 16 poems, only two of which deal with Tom Bombadil, a character who is most famous for his encounter with Frodo Baggins in The Fellowship of the Ring, the first volume in Tolkien's best-selling The Lord of the Rings. The rest of the poems are an assortment of bestiary verse and fairy tale rhyme.

The book was originally illustrated by Pauline Baynes and later by Roger Garland.

The book, like the first edition of The Fellowship of the Ring, is presented as if it is an actual translation from the Red Book of Westmarch, and contains some background information on the world of Middle-earth which is not found elsewhere. Examples are the name of the tower at Dol Amroth and the names of the Seven Rivers of Gondor. There is some dispute about its canonical status since the information presented about the secondary world is considered only as folklore among the Hobbits.

It is also notable because it uses the letter "K" instead of "C" for the /k/ sound in Sindarin, a spelling variant Tolkien alternated many times in his writings.

Tom Bombadil can best be seen as a small, poetic venture into Tolkien's imagination. ==Poems

  1. The Adventures of Tom Bombadil
  2. Bombadil Goes Boating
  3. Errantry
  4. Little Princess Mee
  5. The Man in the Moon stayed up too Late
  6. The Man in the Moon came down too soon
  7. The Stone Troll
  8. Perry-the-Winkle
  9. The Mewlips
  10. Oliphaunt
  11. The Cat
  12. Shadow-Bride
  13. The Hoard
  14. The Sea-Bell
  15. The Last Ship

[[cate