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The Film Book of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings

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The Film Book of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings
AuthorJ.R.R. Tolkien[1]
PublisherFantasy Films Books
Released1978
Formatoblong
Pages76
ISBN0-04-823150-9

The Film Book of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings is a 1978 picture-book, released in advance of the motion picture of the same year, directed by Ralph Bakshi. It features 130 still screens from the film, accompanied by the storyline. As the book was released before the film, it still refers to it as The Lord of the Rings Part One on the back, and the inside flap (see below) speaks of two films. The second film was dropped.

Inside Flap

No other work of modern fiction has achieved such a phenomenal success as J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. Now, this extraordinary story of fantasy, heroism and imagination has been made into a full-length animated film, directed by Ralph Bakshi and produced by Saul Zaentz.

It tells the story of the hobbit Frodo Baggins, who leaves his peaceful home in the Shire and struggles across the mountains and plains of Middle-earth enduring hardship and danger in his attempt to destroy the One Ring: the ring which must not fall into the hands of Sauron, the Dark Lord.

The Lord of the Rings is to be released as two films, and this book follows the story of the first. Using a text based on the film script and a vivid and colourful selection of pictures from the film it tells the tale up to a crisis in the War of the Ring; to a point where the fellowship of those who accompanied Frodo on his mission is broken, and Frodo's own fortunes hang perilously in the balance

Meanwhile, the complete original text of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings may be obtained and enjoyed throughout the world both in hardcover and paperback editions.

Notes

  1. Tolkien is listed as the author in the British Library's catalogue, though it is likely that Peter S. Beagle and Chris Conkling, the film's screenwriters, as well as the unknown writer who adapted it for this book, share the credit.