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Thorin I

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The name Thorin refers to more than one character, item or concept. For a list of other meanings, see Thorin (disambiguation).
Thorin I
Dwarf
Biographical Information
TitlesKing of Durin's Folk
LocationLonely Mountain
Grey Mountains
LanguageKhuzdul
BirthT.A. 2035
Lonely Mountain
RuleT.A. 2190 - 2289
DeathT.A. 2289 (aged 254)
Grey Mountains
Family
HouseHouse of Durin
ParentageThráin I
ChildrenGlóin
Physical Description
GenderMale

Thorin I (Third Age 20352289, died aged 254) was the King of Durin's Folk for 99 years, succeeding his father, Thráin I, on his death in T.A. 2190. Thorin was the heir of Durin the Deathless being the great-grandson of Durin VI.[1]

Contents

History

Thorin was born after his father Thráin had led the Dwarves of Moria away from Khazad-dûm and had founded the Kingdom under the Mountain in Erebor. Thorin himself became King under the Mountain in T.A. 2190. However he heard that the majority of the remnants of Durin's Folk were now gathering in the Grey Mountains. In T.A. 2210 he decided to leave the Lonely Mountain and reunited its people with their brethren in the Grey Mountains which were rich and largely unexplored.

Thorin I died in 2289, at the age of 254, and was succeeded by his son Glóin. His sixth great-grandson, Thorin II Oakenshield, was the much famed leader of the Quest of Erebor which reclaimed the Lonely Mountain from the dragon Smaug.[1]

Genealogy

 
 
 
 
Náin I
1832-1981
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thráin I
1934-2190
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
THORIN I
2035-2289
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Glóin
2136-2385
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Óin
2238-2488
 
 
 
 

Etymology

Thorin's name is one from the Dvergatal. It means "Bold".[2]

Thorin I
House of Durin
Born: T.A. 2035 Died: T.A. 2289
Preceded by:
Thráin I
King of Durin's Folk
T.A. 21902289
Followed by:
Glóin
2nd King under the Mountain
T.A. 21902210
Position Abandoned
Thrór, 379 years later

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix A, "Durin's Folk"
  2. Chester Nathan Gould, "Dwarf-Names: A Study in Old Icelandic Religion", published in Publications of the Modern Language Association of America, Vol 44 (1929), issue #4, pp. 939-967