Tolkien Gateway

Thrushes

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'''Thrushes''' were large speckled brown birds with a special fondness for snails, whose shells they remove by breaking them against stones. A thrush of [[Erebor]] was instrumental in the downfall of [[Smaug]].
 
'''Thrushes''' were large speckled brown birds with a special fondness for snails, whose shells they remove by breaking them against stones. A thrush of [[Erebor]] was instrumental in the downfall of [[Smaug]].
  
Men of [[Lake-men|Lake-town]] and [[Men of Dale|Dale]] could understand the language of the thrushes, and some thrushes could understand the common tongue.
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Men of [[Lake-men|Lake-town]] and [[Men of Dale|Dale]] could understand the language of the thrushes, and some thrushes could understand the [[Westron|common tongue]].
  
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==Portrayal in adaptations==
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'''1982-97: ''[[Middle-earth Role Playing]]'':'''
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: Given gaming statistics, the Thrushes are among Radagast's principal agents and are friends of the Northmen. The thrush language, which can be learned by Elves and Men but not by Dwarves, is called "Throsel-tunge".<ref>{{ICE|2012}}</ref><ref>{{ICE|2016}}</ref>
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{{references}}
 
[[Category:Birds]]
 
[[Category:Birds]]
 
[[de:Drosseln]]
 
[[de:Drosseln]]
 
[[fi:Rastaat]]
 
[[fi:Rastaat]]

Revision as of 17:17, 19 November 2010

File:The Old Thrush.jpg
The Old Thrush by Mark Poole

Thrushes were large speckled brown birds with a special fondness for snails, whose shells they remove by breaking them against stones. A thrush of Erebor was instrumental in the downfall of Smaug.

Men of Lake-town and Dale could understand the language of the thrushes, and some thrushes could understand the common tongue.

Portrayal in adaptations

1982-97: Middle-earth Role Playing:

Given gaming statistics, the Thrushes are among Radagast's principal agents and are friends of the Northmen. The thrush language, which can be learned by Elves and Men but not by Dwarves, is called "Throsel-tunge".[1][2]

References

  1. Ruth Sochard Pitt, Jeff O'Hare, Peter C. Fenlon, Jr. (1994), Creatures of Middle-earth (2nd edition) (#2012)
  2. Zachariah Woolf (1995), Lake-town (#2016)