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Unfinished Tales

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Part One: The [[First Age]]:
 
Part One: The [[First Age]]:
 
* "Of [[Tuor]] and his Coming to [[Gondolin]]"
 
* "Of [[Tuor]] and his Coming to [[Gondolin]]"
* "[[Narn i Chîn Húrin]] (The Tale of the Children of [[Húrin]])" <!-- Chîn and not Hîn, see article -->
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* "[[Narn i Chîn Húrin]] (The Tale of the Children of [[Húrin Thalion|Húrin]])" <!-- Chîn and not Hîn, see article -->
 
Part Two: The [[Second Age]]:
 
Part Two: The [[Second Age]]:
 
* "A Description of the Island of [[Númenor]]"
 
* "A Description of the Island of [[Númenor]]"
 
* "[[Aldarion]] and [[Erendis]]: The Mariner's Wife"
 
* "[[Aldarion]] and [[Erendis]]: The Mariner's Wife"
 
* "The Line of [[Elros]]: Kings of Númenor"
 
* "The Line of [[Elros]]: Kings of Númenor"
* "The History of [[Galadriel]] and [[Celeborn]]"
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* "The History of [[Galadriel]] and [[Celeborn, Lord of Lórien|Celeborn]]"
 
Part Three: The [[Third Age]]:
 
Part Three: The [[Third Age]]:
 
* "The Disaster of the [[Gladden Fields]]"
 
* "The Disaster of the [[Gladden Fields]]"

Revision as of 23:47, 22 April 2006

Unfinished Tales (full title Unfinished Tales of Númenor and Middle-earth) is a collection of stories by J. R. R. Tolkien that were never completed during his lifetime, but were edited by his son Christopher Tolkien and published in 1980.

Unlike The Silmarillion, for which the narrative fragments were modified to connect into a consistent and coherent work, the Unfinished Tales are presented as Tolkien left them, with little more than names changed (the author having had a confusing habit of trying out different names for a character while writing a draft). Thus some of these are incomplete stories, while others are collections of "factual" information about Middle-earth. Each tale is followed by a long series of notes explaining inconsistencies and obscure points.

As with The Silmarillion, Christopher Tolkien edited and published Unfinished Tales before he had finished his study of the materials in his father's archive. Despite its shortcomings in editorial consistency, Unfinished Tales does provide more detailed information about characters, events and places mentioned only briefly in The Lord of the Rings. Versions of such tales including the origins of Gandalf and the Istari (Wizards), the death of Isildur and the loss of the One Ring in the Gladden Fields, and the founding of the kingdom of Rohan help expand knowledge about Middle-earth.

Of particular note is the tale of Aldarion and Erendis, the only known story of Númenor before its fall. A map of Númenor is also included in the book.

The commercial success of Unfinished Tales demonstrated that the demand for Tolkien's stories several years after his death was not only still present, it was growing. Encouraged by the result, Christopher Tolkien began to embark upon the more ambitious twelve-volume work entitled The History of Middle-earth which encompasses nearly the entire corpus of Tolkien's writings about Middle-earth.

Contents

Part One: The First Age:

Part Two: The Second Age:

Part Three: The Third Age:

Part Four