Tolkien Gateway

User:Galdor of the Trees

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Though I love all of Tolkien's works, the Silmarillion is my favorite.  That is all you need to know.
 
Though I love all of Tolkien's works, the Silmarillion is my favorite.  That is all you need to know.
 
</center>[[Image:House-of-the-Tree.jpg|left|100px]]
 
</center>[[Image:House-of-the-Tree.jpg|left|100px]]
The character, Galdor of the Trees, is one of the few high lords of Gondolin that escaped its fall.  The character is good with a club and a spear and is the leader of the House of the Tree.
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The character, Galdor of the Trees, is one of the few high lords of Gondolin that escaped its fall.  The character is good with a club and a spear and is the leader of the House of the Tree.  My brother is Galdor of the Havens.
  
  
 
I consider myself an unorthodox reader of Tolkien's works, I believe he created such a beutiful and open ended world for the addition of infinite possibility.  I am also an optimist, and make some radical connections with Tolkien's work (though I hold strongly to the ideal that it has NOTHING to do with the world around us).
 
I consider myself an unorthodox reader of Tolkien's works, I believe he created such a beutiful and open ended world for the addition of infinite possibility.  I am also an optimist, and make some radical connections with Tolkien's work (though I hold strongly to the ideal that it has NOTHING to do with the world around us).

Revision as of 21:22, 10 December 2009

Though I love all of Tolkien's works, the Silmarillion is my favorite. That is all you need to know.

The character, Galdor of the Trees, is one of the few high lords of Gondolin that escaped its fall. The character is good with a club and a spear and is the leader of the House of the Tree. My brother is Galdor of the Havens.


I consider myself an unorthodox reader of Tolkien's works, I believe he created such a beutiful and open ended world for the addition of infinite possibility. I am also an optimist, and make some radical connections with Tolkien's work (though I hold strongly to the ideal that it has NOTHING to do with the world around us).